COVID-19: Guidance Material for Air Operators Managing Travellers Coming to Canada from Transborder & International Airports

On this page

This guidance material is intended to provide recommendations and guidance on the operationalization of Transport Canada’s Interim Order, Interim Order Respecting Certain Requirements for Civil Aviation Due to COVID-19, No. 41.

This document also includes material related to key aspects of the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Emergency Orders:

Important Caveat: Nothing in this guidance document supersedes any requirement or obligation outlined in Transport Canada’s Interim Order or the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Emergency Orders. It is meant to complement these legal documents and provide recommendations and guidance on how to understand and carry out the requirements.

Overview

This guidance material, dated October 6, 2021, replaces the September 23, 2021 version. This version includes the following updates:

  1. Updated messaging to re-enforce that Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMPs) are being issued in cases where travellers are being boarded with an invalid pre-departure COVID -19 molecular test.
  2. Revised language around the India NOTAM/Schedule 1 (indicating that while the NOTAM has expired, India remains on Schedule 1 (i.e., pre-departure COVID-19 tests are not accepted from India) but that an exemption is in place for specific circumstances.
  3. More information about the exempt traveller profile in ArriveCAN, which may benefit air crew (see Annex E).
  4. Updated the link to reference Interim Order No. 41.

Section 1 – Notification & Confirmation Process

Prior to boarding, air operators have an obligation to notify each traveller of certain measures in place for air travel due to COVID-19 (wherever it fits best into their business model). Sample communications have been prepared to assist air operators in notifying passengers of the required information in Annex A (email to send to travellers before their trip) and Annex B (pre-board announcement). These products cover off all notification requirements for air operators.

Note: In addition, while not a formal notification requirement, a sample email has also been prepared (Annex A1), which can be used to inform travellers of the new prohibition beginning April 22, 2021 at 23:30 EDT. Under this prohibition, travellers cannot submit a pre-departure test that was administered from any country listed on Schedule 1 of the Interim Order.

AIR OPERATORS must notify every traveller of the following, as indicated in the Interim Order:

  • Vaccination Status: all travellers must provide evidence of their vaccination status and related information, through ArriveCAN, before entering Canada, unless exempt. Travellers who are required to provide this information, and fail to comply, may face a fine.
  • Pre-departure COVID-19 testing: Prior to boarding a flight to Canada (from the last point of departure to Canada), all travellers regardless of their vaccination status, unless exempt (see Annex C for summary information on exemptions) are obligated to provide proof of a COVID-19 molecular test result.
  • Suitable Quarantine Plan: Within 72 hours prior to arrival in Canada, all travellers, unless exempt, must use ArriveCAN to digitally submit their travel information, their 14 day travel history prior to arrival in Canada, contact information, and suitable quarantine plan. If the traveller fails to comply with these requirements they could be subject to fines upon arrival in Canada.
  • Health Screening: Travellers may not be permitted to board if:
    • they are exhibiting: (1) a fever and cough; or (2) a fever and difficulty breathing; unless they have a medical certificate indicating these symptoms are not related to COVID-19;
    • they have, or have any reason to suspect they have, COVID-19; or
    • they have not been permitted to board an aircraft in the previous 14 days for medical reasons related to COVID-19.

    Note: Travellers must be notified that if they knowingly provide any false or misleading information about their health, they may be subject to a monetary penalty of up to $5,000.

  • Face Mask: Travellers must be in possession of a face mask, even if fully vaccinated (see Annex F for more information related to face masks) prior to boarding and must wear the face mask throughout their entire travel journey, unless they have a medical certificate certifying they are unable to wear a face mask for medical reasons (see Conditions Preventing the Wearing of Face Masks or Face Coverings for an example certificate). Travellers must also comply with any instructions given by a gate agent or a crew member with respect to wearing a face mask.
  • Federal/Provincial/Territorial Measures: Travellers may be subject to provincial, territorial or federal government measures upon arrival at their destination in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 (Annex G provides a summary of the provincial/territorial restrictions).

TRAVELLERS must confirm the following to the air operator as indicated in the Interim Order:

  • In a single confirmation, travellers must confirm that they: (1) do not have or suspect they have COVID-19; and (2) they have not been denied boarding by an air operator in the previous 14 days due to a medical reason related to COVID-19.

    Note: a competent adult may answer these questions on behalf of a minor or another adult who may require assistance (in a situation where it is required).

  • They are in possession of a face mask that meets the requirements outlined by the Public Health Agency of Canada (see Annex F) or have a medical certificate certifying they are unable to wear a face mask due to medical reasons (see Conditions Preventing the Wearing of Face Masks or Face Coverings for an example certificate).
  • They understand that they may be subject to provincial, territorial or federal government measures upon arrival at their destination in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Section 2 - Pre-board Process

  • Check-in Process: Recommended Operational Approach for Assessing COVID-19 Test Results:
    The following process is recommended for travellers that are travelling directly without a connecting flight, when checking baggage. In order to ensure the smoothest travel journey for travellers and as little operational disruption as possible for air operators, it is strongly recommended that upon arrival at the airport, travellers present themselves to the check-in counter to provide their COVID-19 molecular test result. The agent at check-in can verify the result against the required criteria and then either: 1) allow the traveller to continue on their journey; or 2) stop them before they continue onwards and check their bags. This will avoid having to reconcile baggage should a traveller check their bag and then get denied boarding at the gate.
  • Pre-board Announcement: Deliver the pre-board announcement (Annex B).

Section 3 - Boarding Process

The following identifies the requirements of air operators in the boarding process as it relates to the COVID-19 measures outlined in the Interim Order.

Verification Requirements of Air Operators:

  • Verification of COVID-19 molecular test result: Air operators must verify the molecular test result documentation for the following criteria, unless the traveller is exempt. Please note that fully vaccinated travellers must still provide a pre-departure COVID-19 molecular test result.

    The test result must include the following:

    • Name of the traveller matches the traveller’s identification
    • The test result was not administered from a country listed on Schedule 1 of the Interim Order. This includes both positive and negative test results (any test result administered from a country listed on Schedule 1 of the Interim Order is not accepted). It should be noted that the exemptions under the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations) order continue to apply (e.g., if a traveller arrives with a test result from a country that is listed on Schedule 1 of the Interim Order but is in fact exempt from providing a pre-departure test result they may still be boarded).
      Note on exemption for India pre-departure tests: an exemption is in place to accept a COVID-19 pre-departure test for direct flights from India if: (1) the molecular PCR test result was negative taken 18 hours before the initial scheduled departure; and (2) the test result was issued from Genestrings Diagnostic Centre Pvt. Ltd. at the Delhi Airport. Tests that indicate a positive result may also be accepted if they were taken within 14-180 days of the scheduled departure from a certified lab in India. Please note for indirect flights, pre-departure test results (whether positive or negative) must be from a third country (not from India).
    • The test result is either negative or positive:
      • If the test result is negative, it must be dated within 72 hours of the traveller’s scheduled departure time to Canada (the 72 hours should be assessed from the scheduled departure time from last point of departure coming directly to Canada – see Annex D for information on the 72 hour testing window);
      • If the test result is positive, it must be dated at least 14 days before but not more than 180 days prior to the traveller’s scheduled departure time to Canada (e.g., the traveller would be eligible to travel on day 15 after their test was administered, since 14 days have passed). This accounts for those that had contracted COVID-19, have recovered, but may still be testing positive due to lingering amounts of the virus in their system.

Note: “not detected” is accepted as equivalent to negative; however, if the test result indicates “inconclusive”, this is not acceptable; the traveller is be to denied boarding.

Air operators do not need to assess the test for any other elements at this time (e.g., whether or not the test results come from an accredited laboratory or clinic). As long as the test appears legitimate, and meets the elements noted above it should be accepted.

Reporting requirements: Air operators are asked to make best efforts to assess that the test results are authentic, following the typical operating procedures that have been developed across the international aviation industry in recent months. If the air operator suspects that a traveller is providing false or misleading information with respect to their COVID-19 molecular test, they must report the traveller’s name and flight information to the Minister of Transport, as soon as feasible (generally expected within 24-48 hours after the incident or sooner). This can be done by contacting the Transport Canada Situation Centre and reporting as many details as possible, such as the:

  • date and flight number;
  • traveller’s name and contact information, including the person’s date of birth, home address, telephone number and email address;
  • circumstances related to this situation (e.g., what made the air operator suspicious that the information was not accurate, any names of witnesses, etc.).

It should be noted that it is the travellers responsibility to be informed on requirements and to have proof of their COVID-19 molecular test result, either printed or in electronic form, and to ensure it is from an accredited laboratory. The language of the test is not specified, however if it is not in English or French, travellers may face processing delays once they arrive in Canada. Travellers can refer to the following link for more information: https://travel.gc.ca/travel-covid/travel-restrictions/flying-canada-checklist/covid-19-testing-travellers-coming-into-canada#getting-tested.

Information on Inadmissible Travellers: It is recognized that in some cases when travellers are deemed inadmissible upon arrival, and are not permitted entry into the country of their destination, it can be virtually impossible to obtain a COVID-19 molecular test, and as such, would leave the traveller stranded. As per the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations) air operators are permitted to board a Canadian Citizen, permanent resident, temporary resident, protected person or, a person registered as an Indian under the Indian Act who resides in Canada even if they do not have a COVID-19 molecular test result, if they were denied entry to a foreign country or territory and must subsequently board an aircraft destined to Canada.

For more information on Pre-Departure Testing, including further guidance on the 72 hour testing window, residual positives, and other relevant information, please refer to Annex D. Additionally, please refer to Annex I for a template letter that air crew can present when boarding an aircraft which indicates that they are exempt from pre-departure testing, arrival testing, and quarantine.

Note on enforcement: The pre-departure test is a key component of the layers of measures in place to ensure the safety of all travellers, crew, and the general public against COVID-19. While initial efforts focused on education and awareness, this transition period has now ended and Transport Canada has begun to take necessary enforcement action when non-compliances are identified. This includes issuing AMPs to air carriers if travellers are permitted to board a flight without a valid COVID-19 molecular pre-departure test, which meets the criteria noted above. Transport Canada will continue to take enforcement action, including AMPs, when non-compliance of these provisions are identified.

  • Observe whether travellers boarding the flight exhibit COVID-19 symptoms and deny boarding to those who exhibit a fever and a cough or a fever and difficulty breathing, unless they have a medical certificate (see Conditions Causing Elevated Body Temperatures for an example certificate).
  • Face Mask Verification: verify that every traveller boarding the flight is wearing a face mask, even if fully vaccinated, unless exempt (refer to Annex F for more details, including some exceptions).

Note on Prohibition of Entry outlined in Public Health Agency of Canada’s (PHAC) Emergency Orders

Discretionary Travel:

As of September 7, 2021, the Government of Canada is allowing fully vaccinated foreign nationals travelling to Canada for discretionary reasons (i.e. tourism, recreation or entertainment) to enter the country as long as they have entered all of the required information in ArriveCAN before boarding their flight to Canada. Air operators are responsible for verifying that the information has been entered in ArriveCAN, by checking that travellers have an ArriveCAN receipt indicating that all of the requirements have been met. If the traveller does not have an ArriveCAN receipt, and is claiming to be fully vaccinated and travelling for discretionary purposes, the air operator can advise the traveller that they will need to download the app on the spot and enter all the required information in order to obtain an ArriveCAN receipt. If the traveller does not have an ArriveCAN receipt, and does not meet the exceptions noted below, the traveller is to be denied boarding. Please refer to Annex J for a decision-making tool to assist air operators with this process.

Exceptions to this requirement: If there has been a natural disaster, service disruption or inadequate infrastructure which has rendered it impossible for a willing traveller to submit their information, paper copies of a traveller’s proof of vaccination will be accepted. Please note the transition period, which was September 7-9, 2021, has now concluded, when passengers were allowed some leeway to use the paper copy forms if they were unable to download the new version of ArriveCAN to obtain a receipt.

The paper PHAC Contact Tracing form should be verified that the traveller is eligible and to that the following fields are completed (Data fields: Personal information, Travel information including “discretionary travel”, COVID Vaccination information). Should the traveller be unable to complete the “PHAC contact tracing form” prior to boarding, it can be completed on arrival in Canada.

Note: If there is any uncertainty the air operator should contact the Air Carrier Support Center (1-844-880-6527).

Is it important to note that the final assessment whether or not a traveller is eligible to enter Canada will be done by Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) upon arrival. It is the traveller’s responsibility to ensure they are eligible to enter Canada as per the COVID-19 measures in place at the federal, provincial and territorial level and that they have all the proper approvals and documentation in hand, as it relates to any provisions in the Emergency Orders. In some cases, travellers may present documentation to the air operator when boarding in which case, the air operator can inform the traveller that their eligibility will be officially assessed when they arrive in Canada.

Note on International Students: the guidance for students is that they are allowed to enter Canada no more than 4 weeks prior to when school begins. This allows time for students to quarantine for 14 days and settle for 2 weeks prior to school starting. Please note that CBSA has highlighted that there have been a number of instances of students encountering significant challenges in making travel arrangements that meet this guideline due to the limited availability of flights. The CBSA would like to advise air operators that, effective immediately, students who are seeking to travel to Canada to study at a designated learning institution for the fall 2021 semester, and who are unable to book travel within the 4 week window, will be permitted to enter Canada, so long as they meet all other requirements.

Travellers remain encouraged to use the Travel Wizard in order to assist in determining their eligibility to enter Canada.

PHAC’s Emergency Orders (Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Prohibition of Entry into Canada from the United States) or Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Prohibition of Entry into Canada from any Country Other than the United States)), remain the official source for information about who is eligible to enter Canada as it pertains to COVID-19 measures.

In situations not specifically related to the COVID-19 measures, air operators should continue to follow the normal process for assessing travellers (under the Immigration Refugee Protection Act).

Section 4 – Denial of Boarding

The air operator is to deny boarding in any of the following cases as it relates to the provisions outlined in the Interim Order:

  • 1. Pre-departure COVID-19 test: the traveller will be refused boarding if they fail to meet any of the following:
    • name of traveller does not match the traveller’s identification
    • the test result was administered in a country that is listed in Schedule 1 of the Interim Order. Please note that the exemptions under the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations) order still apply, which includes those exempt from providing a pre-departure test.
      Note on exemption for India pre-departure tests: an exemption is in place to accept a COVID-19 pre-departure test for direct flights from India if: (1) the molecular PCR test result was negative taken 18 hours before the initial scheduled departure; and (2) the test result was issued from Genestrings Diagnostic Centre Pvt. Ltd. at the Delhi Airport. Tests that indicate a positive result may also be accepted if they were taken within 14-180 days of the scheduled departure from a certified lab in India. Air carriers are not to deny boarding if the exemption applies.
      Please note for indirect flights, pre-departure test results (whether positive or negative) must be from a third country (not from India).
    • test result is negative but was not conducted within the valid testing window (within 72 hours prior to the scheduled departure time to Canada);
    • test result is positive but was not conducted within the valid testing window (at least 14 days but not more than 180 days from the scheduled departure time to Canada) As an example, the traveller would be denied boarding if they had a positive test administered less than 15 days (which is 14 days or less) or more than 180 days from their scheduled departure to Canada;
    • test result is inconclusive;
    • test result is not for a molecular test; or
    • traveller refuses to provide proof of a test.
  • 2. Health Check: traveller will be denied boarding if they refuse to answers questions related to the health check or do not pass the health check.
  • 3. Face Mask: traveller will be denied boarding if they do not have a face mask in their possession or refuse to wear their face mask when instructed to do so by a crew member or gate agent (see Annex F for details related to wearing a face mask, including exceptions).
  • 4. Discretionary Travel: as noted in PHAC’s emergency order - Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Prohibition of Entry into Canada from the United States) fully vaccinated foreign nationals, coming for discretionary purposes, who have do not have an ArriveCAN receipt, unless they meet an exemption, are to be denied boarding. Foreign nationals transiting through Canada, and who remain in the sterile area, continue to be permitted to board.

    Note: Air operators are asked to advise foreign nationals claiming to be fully vaccinated and coming for discretionary purposes who do not have an ArriveCAN receipt to download the app on the spot and enter in all the required information to obtain an ArriveCAN receipt. If they are able to obtain an ArriveCAN receipt, they can board.

    Please note the following exemptions do apply (air operators can refer to Annex J, which is a decision-making tool to assist in the board/no-board decision). Should a traveller meet one of these exemptions they are allowed to board (not to be denied boarding):

    Exceptions to this requirement: If there has been a natural disaster, service disruption or inadequate infrastructure which has rendered it impossible for a willing traveller to submit their information, paper copies of a traveller’s proof of vaccination will be accepted.

If a denial of boarding situation occurs, the AIR OPERATOR should follow these steps:

  • Provide explanation for future travel – Air operators must explain to air travellers who are denied boarding, based on the health check, observation of symptoms or elevated temperature, that they will need to wait a full 14 days before they are able to fly (i.e., they would be eligible to fly on day 15) or that they will need to provide a medical certificate indicating the symptoms that they are exhibiting are not related to COVID-19.
  • Advise air travellers to follow local health authorities related to COVID-19 – travellers who have been denied boarding, due to COVID-19 symptoms, should follow the guidance/direction from their provincial/territorial health authorities.
  • Inform air travellers that, the Government of Canada provides consular service to Canadians abroad (refer to: About Consular Services). Canadian government offices abroad do not provide medical attention (including administering COVID-19 molecular testing) or cover medical expenses for Canadian citizens abroad, but can provide direction to resources.
  • Encourage Canadians travelling abroad to register with the Registration of Canadians Abroad if they have not done so already. This service enables Canadians to receive important safety updates from the Government of Canada.

Section 5 – In Flight & De-planing

The following is to be conducted as appropriate and in accordance with the Interim Order:

  • Face Masks: ensure crew and travellers are wearing their face mask; even if fully vaccinated. Some exceptions do apply and may include but are not limited to: when on the flight deck, when safety is in question, due to operational requirements, or for brief periods when eating, drinking or taking oral medications (see Annex F for more information).

    If, during a flight, a traveller refuses to comply with an instruction given by a crew member with respect to wearing a face mask, the AIR OPERATOR must inform the Minister, as soon as feasible (generally expected within 24-48 hours after the incident or sooner) as well as keep a record of the following information for a period of 12 months (see Annex I for information on retention periods):

    • the date and flight number;
    • the traveller’s name and contact information, including the person’s date of birth, home address, telephone number and email address;
    • the traveller’s seat number on the flight; and
    • the circumstances related to the refusal to comply.

    Note: These records must be made available to the Minister of Transport upon request, not just immediately following the incident. Air operators are not expected to update their systems if the information that is provided does not match; however, every effort to ensure all relevant information is relayed to Transport Canada in a timely manner is appreciated. Ensuring this information related to the incident is as complete and accurate as possible will be essential in facilitating Transport Canada’s ability to conduct a suitable investigation. Having the support and assistance of air operators in the process will be key to ensuring that there is sufficient evidence to take enforcement action, if required.

  • Deliver the in-flight announcement prior to landing in Canada and de-planning (see Annex H).

Section 6 – Post-Arrival in Canada: Information on what travellers should expect on arrival as of August 9, 2021

Role of the Air Operator

Once travellers arrive in Canada, deplane, and enter the airport, air operators do not have any official obligations as it pertains to COVID-19 measures. However, air operators are asked to communicate to travellers regarding the travel restrictions in place in Canada to facilitate the smoothest travel journey possible for all parties (see the sample email for travellers (Annex A), the pre-board announcement (Annex B) and the in-flight announcement (Annex H)).

Day-1 On-Arrival Testing

Upon arrival, all partially or unvaccinated travellers 5 years or older will be subject to an on-arrival test (either at the airport or travellers will be given a take home test kit). Fully vaccinated travellers will be subject to randomized selection on-arrival tests (i.e. travellers would be tested should they be selected through the random selection process at which time an on-site testing would be done or provided with a take-home test kit.)

Transiting Travellers

Transiting travellers are exempt from arrival testing, as long as they remain in the sterile area of the airport and do not cross into Canada. Should a traveller unexpectedly enter Canada due to unforeseen delays or cancellations of their connecting flight, they may be exempt from arrival testing, however, they may be required to stay at a near-by hotel and quarantine until their next flight. In these cases, they will be referred to Public Health Officials for further direction.

Unaccompanied minors

Unaccompanied minors that are travelling to Canada are still subject to pre-departure testing (5 years of age and older), as well as the mandatory 14 day quarantine requirements (if not fully vaccinated). They will not be subject to on-arrival testing, but will be subject to an alternative testing protocol; more details will be provided by public health officials upon arrival.

Note: the processing of unaccompanied minors upon arrival relating to COVID-19 public health measures is overseen/enforced by the Public Health Agency of Canada (for more information please visit: https://travel.gc.ca/travel-covid/travel-restrictions/flying-canada-checklist/covid-19-testing-travellers-coming-into-canada.

Advantages for fully vaccinated travellers (who are permitted to enter Canada)

Fully vaccinated travellers who are permitted to enter Canada will not be subject to the federal requirement to quarantine for 14 days or take a COVID-19 test on day-1 or- 8 following their arrival.

To be exempted from quarantine, travellers must meet all of the following conditions:

  • Be asymptomatic;
  • Enter all information, including proof of vaccination in ArriveCAN (unless an exception applies);
  • Have a quarantine plan;
  • Show evidence of a COVID-19 molecular test indicating that they received either a negative result for a test that was performed no more than 72 hours before the flight’s initial scheduled departure time, or a positive result for the test that was performed on a specimen collected at least 14 days and no more than 180 days before the flight’s initial scheduled departure time;
  • Be considered a fully vaccinated traveller and meet all relevant criteria and requirements; and
  • Comply with any other applicable requirements imposed under the relevant Quarantine Act Emergency Orders

It must be noted that based on a traveller's exposure history and/or symptomatic status, they may still be required to quarantine. If the traveller does not have a suitable quarantine plan, they may be required to go to a designated quarantine facility for their quarantine period.

Provinces and territories may have their own provincial border measures as well as public health guidelines within their jurisdictions; it is important that travellers check for the most up to date information for requirements for travel into Canada but also requirements imposed by their intended province or territory of destination.

Unvaccinated dependent children under the age of 12 who enter Canada with their fully vaccinated parents or guardians will no longer have to complete a 14 day quarantine, but must follow strict public health measures. This includes those travelling for discretionary purposes. This means they can move around with their parents, but must avoid group settings such as camps or daycares, and/or avoid contact with vulnerable people during the first 14 days after their arrival. Unvaccinated children under 12 years old will be subject to an alternative testing protocol; more details will be provided by public health officials upon arrival. Provinces and territories may have more stringent rules around people who have recently returned from travel.

Those who are medically unable to receive a vaccine or complete a vaccine dosage regimen will also be exempt from the 14 day quarantine, but must follow strict public health measures. It should be noted that the medical exemption will be limited to specific medical conditions that are known to be a contraindication of the vaccine and that the traveller must have in their possession written evidence from a physician who is licensed to practice medicine confirming the fact.

Travelling with Unvaccinated Children aged 12 to 17 and Unvaccinated Dependent Adults (who are permitted to enter Canada)

Unvaccinated children aged 12 to 17 and unvaccinated dependent adults (i.e. with a mental or physical disability) travelling with fully vaccinated parents or guardians will remain subject to the 14 day quarantine, as well as be subject to the Day 1 and Day 8 testing requirements, unless otherwise exempt.

Onward Travel

All travellers are able to travel onwards to their final destination: they can take domestic flights or use other means of public transportation but they must follow all public health measures through onward travel, such as wearing a mask.

Partially vaccinated or unvaccinated travellers who have cleared CBSA processing will be asked to take their day 1 test on site at the airport or be given a take home test kit. If testing is done on-site at the airport; once completed, they will be able to travel onward domestically. Fully vaccinated travellers are subject to randomized testing.

Annex A - Sample Email to Send to Travellers

Subject: Travel Measures by the Government of Canada related to COVID-19

Good day,

In advance of your upcoming travel to Canada, we wanted to provide you with some important information about the current travel restrictions and what you can expect upon arrival to Canada. The different measures are outlined below to travel to Canada by air. It is important to note that many restrictions are still in place, even for fully vaccinated travellers.

Update on Discretionary Travel:

As of September 7, 2021, fully vaccinated foreign nationals can travel to Canada for discretionary reasons (i.e. tourism, recreation, or entertainment).

Note: Although the final determination as to whether or not you can enter Canada will be made by a government representative at the port of entry, all travellers are encouraged to first consult the Travel Wizard to determine/confirm if they are eligible to come to Canada.

Requirements to Travel to Canada:

In order to board a flight to Canada, all travellers, even if fully vaccinated, must:

  • Present one of the following COVID-19 molecular test results (if you are 5 years old or older):
    • a test result that is negative, that was administered within 72 hours of the traveller's scheduled departure time to Canada (must be 72 hours from the scheduled direct flight to Canada); or
    • a test result that is positive, that was administered at least 14 days but no more than 180 days from the traveller's scheduled departure time to Canada
  • Use the ArriveCAN app or website to submit the following information their travel information, contact information, 14 day travel history prior to arrival in Canada, vaccination information, suitable quarantine plan, and a symptom self-assessment.

    Travellers can download the ArriveCAN app for free on Google Play and Apple App store or provide their information by signing in online. Please ensure you have the most recent version of the app downloaded.

At the airport, all travellers must:

  • be symptom-free in order to board the plane. If you are exhibiting obvious symptoms you will be denied boarding.
  • have a face mask and wear it throughout your travel journey, including while in flight, even if you are fully vaccinated. You will need comply with any instructions provided to you by the crew or airport personnel.

Upon arrival in Canada, all travellers must:

  • have all their travel documents in hand and ready to present to Government of Canada officials. This includes their paper copy proof of vaccination (if applicable) and ArriveCAN receipt (unless exempt), indicating they have provided all the necessary information, and any other entry documents you may require (if applicable).

  • undergo an on-arrival test either at the airport or via a take-home kit (vaccinated travellers may be subject to mandatory randomized on-arrival testing). Unvaccinated or partially vaccinated travellers are encouraged to pre-register for arrival testing where possible using the following links based on their arrival location in Canada:

    Vancouver (YVR): https://checkout.lifelabs.com/arrival-registration
    Calgary (YYC): https://numihealth.com/covid-19-testing/
    Toronto-Pearson (YYZ): https://www.switchhealth.ca/en/travel/pearson/
    Montreal-Trudeau (YUL): https://info.biron.ca/inscription-yul

  • quarantine (if applicable). Please note that all fully vaccinated travellers that are eligible to enter Canada are no longer required to quarantine. However, partially vaccinated or unvaccinated travelers are still required to go immediately to their place of quarantine and quarantine for 14 days, as well as complete a day-8 arrival test. At any point if any traveller (fully vaccinated or not) receives a positive test result from their arrival test, they must immediately isolate for a period of 10 days.

    Note: there is no longer a requirement for any traveller, regardless of vaccination status, to make a booking at a government approved accommodation (hotel) to begin quarantine. The government approved accommodations have been discontinued

  • be aware that they may be subject to additional measures identified by the provincial, territorial or local health authorities. It is up to the traveller to be aware of any additional measures at their destination and be ready to comply as required.

Note: Further information can also be found at COVID-19: Entering Canada requirements checklist – Travel restrictions in Canada – Travel.gc.ca.

Additional Information/Resources:

  • Definition of fully vaccinated: to be considered fully vaccinated, a traveller must have received the full series of a vaccine or combination of vaccines accepted by the Government of Canada at least 14 days prior to entering Canada. Currently, those vaccines are manufactured by Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca/COVISHIELD, and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson). Travellers can receive their vaccine in any country, and must provide documentation supporting their vaccination in English, French or with a certified translation. For more information on coming to Canada as a fully vaccinated traveller please visit: COVID-19 vaccinated travellers entering Canada - Travel restrictions in Canada – Travel.gc.ca.

    Fully vaccinated travellers must also be symptom free, have a paper or digital copy of their vaccination documentation, and provide COVID-19-related information electronically through ArriveCAN prior to arrival in Canada. They must still present a suitable quarantine plan, and be prepared to quarantine, in case it is determined at the border that they do not meet all of the conditions required to be exempt from quarantine and other post-arrival requirements. As with all other exempt travellers, they will be required to follow public health measures in place, such as wearing a mask when in public, keep a copy of their vaccine and test results, as well as a list of close contacts for 14 days after entry to Canada.

  • Travelling with unvaccinated children: unvaccinated dependent children under the age of 12 who enter Canada with their fully vaccinated parents or guardians will no longer have to complete a 14 day quarantine, but must follow strict public health measures. This includes those travelling for discretionary purposes. This means they can move around with their parents, but must avoid group settings (such as camps or daycares) and/or avoid contact with vulnerable people during the first 14 days after their arrival. Unvaccinated children under 12 years old will be subject to an alternative testing protocol; more details will be provided by public health officials upon arrival. Provinces and territories may have more stringent rules around people who have recently returned from travel.

  • Unvaccinated children aged 12 and 17 and unvaccinated dependent adults (i.e. with a mental or physical disability) travelling with a fully vaccinated parent/guardian will remain subject to the 14 day quarantine, as well as be subject to the Day 1 and Day 8 testing requirements, unless otherwise exempt. Provinces and territories may have more stringent rules around people who have recently returned from travel. Please continue to check https://travel.gc.ca/ for more updates.

  • Unvaccinated or partially vaccinated travellers: for travellers who are not fully vaccinated, the only change is that there is no longer a requirement to stay at a government approved accommodation. Aside from this eliminated requirement, there are no changes to Canada’s current border measures. They must continue to adhere to the current testing and federal quarantine requirements, which have been effective in reducing importation and transmission of COVID-19 and variants in Canada, and provide COVID-19-related information electronically through ArriveCAN before arriving in Canada.

For more information on any of Canada’s currently travel restrictions, please visit https://travel.gc.ca/.

We hope you enjoy your trip to Canada. Stay safe, and be well.

Annex A1 – Sample Email to Send to Travellers regarding Schedule 1 of the Interim Order

[Note to air operators: Should you wish to flag the specific countries to your travellers (i.e., fill in the template below where it indicates to [insert the name of the country]), ensure you are consulting the most up to date version of Schedule 1 of the Interim Order].

Subject: New Government of Canada Travel Measures Related to COVID-19

In an effort to reduce the spread of COVID-19, the Government of Canada has put in place several measures for air travel. One measure that was put in place as of January 2021 is the requirement for all travellers 5 years and older, unless exempt, to present a COVID-19 molecular test result prior to boarding a flight to Canada.

Recently, data has shown that, in a number of cases, travellers who had received a negative COVID-19 test result for a test administered in certain countries, have been testing positive for COVID-19 during their arrival test upon entry to Canada. In order to continue to limit the spread of COVID-19 and its variants in Canada, travellers with a COVID-19 molecular test result conducted in any country identified in schedule 1 of the Interim Order [insert name(s) of countries here], will not be allowed to board a flight to Canada.

About the test result:

All COVID-19 molecular test results must be printed or be presented electronically to the air operator prior to boarding the flight to Canada. The test result itself must have been administered within the following testing windows:

  • A negative COVID-19 molecular test administered within 72 hours of the scheduled departure time of the flight to Canada; or

  • A positive COVID-19 molecular test administered at least 14 days prior but not more than 180 days prior to the traveller’s scheduled departure time to Canada (e.g., the traveller would be eligible to travel on day 15 after their test was administered, since 14 days have passed). This accounts for those that had contracted COVID-19, have since recovered, but may still be testing positive due to lingering amounts of the virus in their system.

As indicated above, tests that were administered in any country identified in Schedule 1 of the Interim Order, will not be accepted. Therefore all travellers would be denied boarding in these cases, unless they are exempt under the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations).

Travellers departing from a country listed on Schedule 1 of the Interim Order will be required to obtain a pre-departure COVID-19 molecular test from a different country in order to be admissible into Canada, within the defined testing windows noted above. This may mean adjusting travel plans in order to visit another country prior to coming to Canada, in order to obtain a test result.

Travellers should take note and be prepared for all of the requirements that are in place before travelling to Canada. For more information on travel requirements please visit https://travel.gc.ca/.

Annex B – Pre-board Notification to Travellers

Note: The pre-board notification can be done online, at automated check-in kiosks by agents at the check-in counter (e.g., pre-board announcement), or by any other means (at the discretion of the air operator).

In order to reduce the spread of COVID-19, the Government of Canada has put in place several measures for air travel. It should be noted that, at this time, discretionary travel to Canada (i.e., tourism, recreation, entertainment), is now permitted for fully vaccinated foreign nationals, meeting all entry requirements. It is the traveller’s responsibility to ensure that they are eligible to enter Canada. More information about eligibility criteria, as well as information about fully vaccinated travellers, can be found on the Government of Canada website, travel.gc.ca.

If you are travelling to Canada for a permissible reason, please be advised that, with a few exceptions:

  • Anyone aged 5 and over travelling to Canada will be required to present a COVID-19 molecular test result in order to board their flight for Canada, even if fully vaccinated. If the test result is negative, it must have been conducted within 72 hours of a traveller’s scheduled flight to Canada in order for the traveller to be allowed to board. If the passenger has had COVID-19, has since recovered, but is still testing positive, they will be permitted to board with a positive test result providing it was administered at least 14 days but not more than 180 days from a traveller’s scheduled flight to Canada as long as they are symptom free. Failure to provide a test result, within either of the accepted testing windows, unless the traveller meets one of the few exceptions, will result in denial of boarding.
  • In addition to the pre-departure COVID-19 molecular test, unvaccinated or partially vaccinated travellers coming to Canada will also be required to undergo a COVID-19 molecular test upon arrival. Fully vaccinated travellers will be subject to mandatory randomized testing upon arrival. This test may be conducted onsite or may be in the form of a take-home kit.
  • Travellers that meet the definition of being fully vaccinated must submit their vaccination status in ArriveCAN in order to take advantage of modified requirements upon arrival. It is important to note that fully vaccinated travellers remain obligated to have a pre-departure COVID-19 molecular test, be symptom-free, and wear a face mask throughout their travel journey (including in-flight).
  • All unvaccinated or partially vaccinated travellers are subject to the 14 day mandatory quarantine period starting the day they enter Canada, and must be able to demonstrate how they plan to fulfill this requirement while in Canada. Failure to comply with the mandatory quarantine could result in imprisonment and/or fines.

Prior to boarding the flight to Canada, please be advised that, with few exceptions:

  • Within 72 hours prior to arrival in Canada, all travellers must provide the following information in ArriveCAN:
    • their travel and contact information;
    • 14 day travel history prior to arrival in Canada;
    • suitable quarantine plan;
    • COVID-19 symptom self-assessment; and
    • Their vaccination information and evidence.
    In order for travellers to take advantage of any of the benefits upon arrival in Canada for being fully vaccinated, they must download the most recent version of ArriveCAN and digitally submit the required information. ArriveCAN is available as a mobile app that is available for download through Google Play or the Apple App store or by signing in online. For more information, or if you require assistance, visit Canada.ca/ArriveCAN.
  • Travellers will be required to answer a few simple questions related to their health, to which they must be answered truthfully. Providing a false or misleading answer could result in a maximum fine of $5,000.
  • Travellers 6 years of age and older must have a face mask that covers their mouth, nose and chin, even if fully vaccinated. The face mask must be used throughout their entire travel journey in order to prevent the inadvertent spread of COVID-19 through respiratory droplets; this includes fully vaccinated travellers.
  • Please note that in the case of children aged 2 to 5, the adult responsible for the child must still ensure that a face mask is made readily available to the child prior to boarding the flight and should, as much as is tolerated, encourage the child to wear the face mask. If a traveller fails to comply with the face mask requirement, they may face a fine of up to $5,000.

Travellers should also be advised that they may be subject to provincial or territorial measures at their destination. Please ensure you are well informed on any local public health requirements.

As a reminder, no person should board a flight when they are feeling ill as this could potentially put others at risk. Should symptoms such as a fever, cough or difficulty breathing develop while in flight, please notify the flight crew immediately.

Stay safe, and thank you for your cooperation.

Annex C – Exemptions: Summary Information

The following table depicts some of the key public health requirement exemptions included in the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Order in Council (OIC) entitled Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations (QIOO)). The table was developed to help find where the various exemptions can be found within the OIC. It also helps better understand how some cohorts are specifically exempted in some cases and where the CPHO exemption for essential workers applies in other cases. Note that the OIC includes many other requirements and as such should be read in its entirety in order to understand the full set of restrictions, obligations and exemptions currently in place.

Cohort Exempt from Pre-Arrival Testing Requirement

 

Exempt from Tests in Canada

 

Exempt from Quarantine

 

Crew Members

  • (a) a crew member as defined in subsection 101.01(1) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations or a person who enters Canada only to become such a crew member;
  • (b) a member of a crew as defined in subsection 3(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations or a person who enters Canada only to become such a member of a crew;
  • (c) a person who is re-entering Canada after having left to participate in mandatory training in relation to the operation of a conveyance and who is required by their employer to return to work as a crew member on a conveyance within the 14-day period that begins on the day on which they return to Canada.

Yes

s. 2.1(2)

(Schedule 1 – Table 1 - Item 2)

Yes

s. 2.3(4)

(Schedule 2 – Table 2 - Item 1)

Yes

s. 4.5

(Schedule 2 – Table 1 - Item 1)

must, under section 3.5(2)(a) & 3.5(2)(b), wear a mask, provide contact information, and

maintain list of contacts and locations visited

A person in the trade or transportation sector who is important for the movement of goods or people, including a truck driver or crew member on any aircraft, shipping vessel or train, who enters Canada for the purpose of performing their duties as a member of that sector.

No

Yes

s. 2.3(4)

(Schedule 2 – Table 2 - Item 4)

CPHO exemption

Yes

s. 4.5

(Schedule 2 – Table 1 - Item 4)

CPHO exemption

must, under section 3.5(2)(a) & 3.5(2)(b), wear a mask, provide contact information, and

maintain list of contacts and locations visited

A person who, as determined by the Minister of Transport, will respond to, investigate, or prevent significant disruptions to the effective continued operation of the national transportation system, transportation undertakings or transportation infrastructure, if the person complies with all conditions imposed on them by the Minister of Transport and developed in consultation with the Minister of Health to minimize the risk of introduction or spread of COVID-19.

Yes

s. 2.1(2)

(Schedule 1 – Table 1 - Item 13)

Yes

s. 2.3(4)

(Schedule 2 – Table 2 - Item 34)

No

Persons in Transit

A person who plans to arrive at a Canadian airport aboard an aircraft in order to transit to a country other than Canada and to remain in a sterile transit area, as defined in section 2 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, until they leave Canada.

Yes

s. 2.1(2)

(Schedule 1 – Table 1 - Item 19)

n/a

n/a

MEDEVAC

Any person who boarded a medical evacuation flight for medical purposes, if the urgency of the medical situation does not permit a COVID-19 molecular test to be administered to the person before boarding the aircraft for the flight to Canada. (patient only)

Yes

s. 2.1(2)

(Schedule 1 – Table 1 - Item 16)

Yes

s. 2.3(4)

(Schedule 2 – Table 2 - Item 30)

No

A Canadian citizen, permanent resident, temporary resident, protected person or person registered as an Indian under the Indian Act who resides in Canada, who has been denied entry in a foreign country and who must board a flight destined to Canada.

Yes

s. 2.1(2)

(Schedule 1 – Table 1 - Item 17)

No

No

Annex D – Additional Information on Pre-Departure Testing

The 72 hour testing window for pre-departure testing

In the case where the traveller presents a negative COVID-19 molecular test result, the test must have been administered no more than 72 hours from the time of the scheduled direct flight to Canada. This means that if a traveller has a connecting flight, the 72 hour window applies to the final leg of their flight that brings them directly to Canada (i.e. the last point of departure). This is due to the fact that Transport Canada can only regulate flights flying directly into Canada. If, for example, a traveller was flying from Paris, France through Frankfurt, Germany with a final destination of Montreal, Canada, the traveller would need to have a pre-departure test that was administered within 72 hours of their scheduled departure time from Frankfurt to Montreal (and not from their scheduled departure time from the origin city, Paris). If for any reason the traveller’s flight gets delayed for issues beyond their control (e.g., bad weather, mechanical issues etc.), the air operators are allowed to use the originally scheduled departure time as the basis for the 72 hour window as it relates to pre-departure testing. This means in the example noted above, if the traveller had a test result that was administered 70 hours before their original scheduled flight from Frankfurt to Montreal, but then their flight was delayed 5 hours due to a winter storm (i.e. a delay beyond their control), they would still be permitted to board despite their test now being 75 hours before their flight to Canada since they still met the testing window requirement (i.e., original scheduled departure time and not the actual scheduled departure time).

72 hours versus 3 days:

In the instance where a traveller presents a test that has no time stamp, air operators are to assess the test result using 3 days as the benchmark. Air operators can use the date of the scheduled flight to Canada as day 1, and count backwards by 3 days, to determine the testing window.

Example: A traveller has a flight scheduled to Canada on Friday, March 5th, 2021 at 10am. They arrive at the airport with a valid molecular COVID-19 test result that is negative. The date stamp on the test result indicates March 2, 2021 for when the test was administered. The air operator can use March 5th less 3 days, which brings us to March 2nd, as their basis to determine whether or not to board the traveller as indicated below in the following sample calculation:

Calculation:
From March 5 to March 4 (-1 day from departure)
From March 4 to March 3 (- 2 days from departure)
From March 3 to March 2 (- 3 days from departure) **limit**
= test is valid if administered on March 2nd or later

Information on Residual Positive:

As outlined in the PHAC Emergency Order, Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations), travellers who have previously tested positive for COVID-19 are permitted to board a flight to Canada if they can provide proof of a positive COVID-19 molecular test result that is at least 14 days (i.e., from day 15 since test was administered) but not more than 180 days from the initial scheduled departure to Canada (this is referred to as a residual positive). They must also be symptom-free, as is the case with all travellers. This provision has been put in place to account for those travellers who previously contracted COVID-19, who have since recovered, but may still have lingering traces of the virus in their system and would still test positive (however are deemed no longer contagious). A traveller that presents a positive COVID-19 molecular test result within the accepted testing window does not need any other supporting documentation at this time; evidence of their positive COVID-19 molecular test within the accepted timeframe (of at least 14 days but not more than 180 days, which means a window of 15-180 days from when the test was administered) is sufficient.

Annex E – Additional Information on ArriveCAN

As outlined in the Transport Canada Interim Order, air operators are required to notify all travellers returning or travelling to Canada via air, that they may be required to digitally submit their suitable quarantine plan, 14 day travel history as well as their vaccination status and that failure to do so could result in a fine. This is to be done through ArriveCAN, within 72 hours prior to their arrival in Canada, and includes providing: travel and contact information; 14 day travel history prior to arriving in Canada; their vaccination status; their suitable quarantine plan (unless exempt under conditions set out in Section 6(1) of the Minimizing the Risk of Exposure to COVID-19 in Canada Order (Quarantine, Isolation and Other Obligations), and a COVID-19 symptom self-assessment. ArriveCAN is available as a mobile app or by signing in online through Canada.ca/ArriveCAN.

In the Interim Order, the notification requirement obliges air operators to notify travellers that they may be required to digitally submit information. This is because in some specific cases there is an exception. In these exceptional cases, it is acceptable to use the paper version to provide the required information. These exceptional cases include:

  • If the person is disabled;
  • If there is inadequate infrastructure;
  • If there is a service disruption; or
  • If there is a natural disaster.

Exempt Essential Travel Profile

As of September 7, 2021, if an individual’s travel is related to any of the below travel purposes, they can save time by creating an exempt essential travel profile and enter their information once. This will allow the traveller to re-use their receipt for each entry into Canada.

  • Cross-border work (e.g., you regularly cross the border to work)
  • Essential services (e.g., you live in an integrated trans-border community)
  • Medical and health care support (e.g., health care practitioner, you received or will receive medical care, or you transport medical equipment or supplies)
  • Trade and transport (e.g., truck driver or crew member on any aircraft, shipping vessel or train)

The traveller will only need to resubmit their information in ArriveCAN if the border services officer determines they are not travelling for exempt essential travel or if they are travelling for non-essential reasons (e.g., discretionary travel). A traveller can submit their information at any time before travel and are no longer required to enter information about their port of entry or date and time of arrival. Information cannot be submitted on behalf of others.

Important Note: Until further notice, Canadian citizens and permanent residents who have not submitted their COVID-19 related information digitally through ArriveCAN prior to boarding are still allowed to board their flight and enter Canada, however, failure for a traveller to submit information using ArriveCAN could result fines upon arrival. Fully vaccinated foreign nationals travelling to Canada for discretionary travel will be denied boarding if they do not input their information in ArriveCAN (unless they meet an exemption).

More information is available here: https://www.Canada.ca/ArriveCAN.

Annex F – Additional Information on Face Masks

The Government of Canada requires that all travellers six years and older wear a face mask large enough to cover their mouth, nose and chin during their entire travel journey. This applies to travellers who are fully vaccinated as well. For more information on face masks, please consult: Non-Medical Face Masks: About.

Travellers must confirm that they have in their possession the mandatory face mask as part of the registration or check-in process, otherwise they will be denied boarding.

Refusal to comply with the wearing of a face mask could result in a fine of $5,000 for the traveller.

Safe Use of Removable Face Masks

Face masks should: Face masks should not:
  • Be made of multiple layersFootnote 1 of tightly woven fabric such as cotton or linen
  • Be large enough to completely and comfortably cover the mouth, nose and chin without gaps
  • Fit securely to the head with ties or ear loops (masks covering a person’s beard or secured around a headwear (e.g. turban) are also considered acceptable)Footnote 2
  • Be made of breathable materials
  • Be comfortable and not require frequent adjustments
  • Be changed as soon as possible if damp or dirty
  • Be stored in a clean paper or cloth bag until you put it on again
  • Be placed on children less than 2 years old
  • Be placed on anyone who’s unable to remove it without assistance
  • Be placed on anyone with a medical certificate indicating they should not wear a mask
  • Be made of materials that easily fall apart, like tissues
  • Be shared with others
  • Impair vision or interfere with tasks
  • Be removed to talk to someone

Note: If you're hard of hearing or interact with people who use lip-reading to communicate, consider wearing a clear maskFootnote 3.

The following outlines instances where there is an exception to the requirement to wear a face mask:

  • If a traveller has a medical certificate indicating they are unable to wear a face mask (see Conditions Preventing the Wearing of Face Masks or Face Coverings for an example certificate).

  • If the traveller is a child who is at least two years of age but less than six years of age (i.e., 2-5 years old) and is unable to tolerate wearing a face mask. In this case, the adult responsible for the child must still ensure that a face mask is made readily available to the child prior to boarding an aircraft for a flight and should still try to encourage the child to wear it.

    Note: Children six and older must wear a face mask when travelling, unless their parent or guardian has a medical certificate certifying they are unable to wear one due to medical reasons.

  • During the flight when the safety of the traveller could be endangered by wearing a face mask or for brief periods when the person is eating, drinking or taking oral medications.

    Note: Travellers should make every effort to finish their drink or eat their food within a period of no longer than 15 minutes. Air operators are encouraged to use this guideline, which is defined by the Public Health Agency of Canada as the threshold for “prolonged exposure” when enforcing this provision; however, it is acknowledged that there will be exceptional circumstances that will require some flexibility. It is also suggested that prior to serving any food or drinks in–flight that travellers be reminded that they are only allowed to remove their face mask for a brief period (which could mean 15 minutes or less) to finish drinking or eating and that they must keep their face mask on while waiting for any food or drink. Should a crew member feel the “brief” timeframe has been exceeded, they will ask them traveller to put their face mask back on. Failure to comply could result in a fine for the traveller.

  • When a person who is asked by an air operator official, Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA), a Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officer, or a Canadian public health official to briefly remove their face mask at the security screening, boarding gate or customs controlled areas of the airport for identification purposes.

Annex G – Provincial/Territorial Travel Entry Requirements

Please note that provincial and territorial information changes on a frequent basis. It is recommended that the following provincial/territorial government websites be consulted to obtain the latest travel information:

Province/Territory

Provincial / Territorial Web link

Alberta

Travellers should consult Alberta COVID-19

British Columbia

Travellers should consult British Columbia COVID-19

Manitoba

Travellers should consult Manitoba COVID-19

New Brunswick

Travellers should consult New Brunswick COVID-19

Newfoundland and Labrador

Travellers should consult Newfoundland and Labrador COVID-19

Northwest Territories

Travellers should consult Northwest Territories COVID-19

Nova Scotia

Travellers should consult Nova Scotia COVID-19

Nunavut

Travellers should consult Nunavut COVID-19

Ontario

Travellers should consult Ontario COVID-19

Prince Edward Island

Travellers should consult Prince Edward Island COVID-19

Quebec

Travellers should consult Quebec COVID-19

Saskatchewan

Travellers should consult Saskatchewan COVID-19

Yukon

Travellers should consult Yukon COVID-19

Annex H – In-flight Announcement Prior to Landing in Canada

In light of the global pandemic related to COVID-19, the Government of Canada has put in place emergency measures to help limit the spread of COVID-19 in Canada.

All travellers are required to provide information prior to landing so that public health officials can contact you if needed. This is a reminder that it is now mandatory for all travellers flying to Canada to use ArriveCAN to submit your travel and contact information, 14 day travel history prior to arriving in Canada, suitable quarantine plan, vaccination information and evidence, and a COVID-19 symptom self-assessment. Travellers must be ready to show their ArriveCAN receipt when seeking entry into Canada; a government official will verify that travellers have submitted their information digitally. For more information, or if you require assistance, visit Canada.ca/ArriveCAN.

Once travellers arrive in Canada, unvaccinated or partially vaccinated travellers will undergo a COVID-19 molecular test on-arrival, unless exempt. In cases where there are high volumes of travellers, a takehome test kit may be provided in lieu of the on-site arrival test at the airport. Fully vaccinated travellers will be subject to a mandatory randomized selection on-arrival test.

Please note that as of August 9, 2021, travellers are no longer required to stay in a government approved accommodation as this requirement has been eliminated.

Travellers are reminded that they must use their face mask during their travel journey, even if fully vaccinated. Upon landing, travellers will be required to wear their face mask when gathering their belongings and leaving the aircraft and until they reach the outside of the air terminal building.

Please have all your travel documentation, including your paper proof of vaccination if applicable, as well as your digital ArriveCAN receipt ready to present to officials upon arrival.

Stay safe and be informed about COVID-19 related information from the national, provincial and territorial health authorities.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Annex I – Template Letter for Crew

Template Letter for Crew

[Letterhead of Industry]

[Insert Date of Letter]

Re: Confirmation of Air Crew Members

To Whom it May Concern,

This letter is to confirm that [Name on Crew Identification] is a member of the air crew of [Name of Air Operator] by virtue of their position as [Crew Member’s Title]. The person is on active duty, or repositioning/returning to perform his/her duties within the next 14 days.

Please process them under any relevant exemptions for air crew:

They are considered an essential worker, crucial to the movement of goods and people and their travel is associated with this work.

It should be noted that while exempt from certain requirements, the crew member still must submit their contact information and maintain a list of close contacts for a period of 14 days.

Should you require any additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me at the coordinates listed below.

Thank you,

[Name of Supervisor/Manager]
[Telephone Number of Supervisor/Manager]
[Email of Supervisor/Manager]

Annex J – Decision-making tool to assist air carriers – Board/No-Board Assessment

Request a copy

Get a PDF copy of this Transport Canada document sent to you by email.