Accessibility Plan

Transport Canada 2022-2025

ISBN

Ottawa, Ontari
December 23, 2022
ISBN T1-37E-PDF

Table of contents

General

Transport Canada's Corporate Services worked with a national working group for accessibility to develop this Accessibility Plan. Our working group had a representative from each region across the country and area of responsibility that operates within Transport Canada.

Transport Canada's designated official for the development of the Accessibility Plan is Ryan Pilgrim, Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services.

Copyright

© His Majesty the King in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, 2023

Accessibility plan
Transport Canada
Ottawa, Canada
December 23, 2023
Catalogue No. 15571E
ISBN T1-37E-PDF

If you need an alternate format of this accessibility plan please email: tc.accessibility-accessibilite.tc@tc.gc.ca.

Feedback

Feedback on our progress report or our accessibility plan can be provided online through our feedback form or through the email, mail, or phone options listed below.

When asked, we commit to providing these alternate formats as soon as possible and within the time frames listed in the Accessible Canada Regulations and the Acemcessible Transportation Planning and Reporting Regulations subsection 7(1) and 7(2) alternate formats of our plan can be requested in:

  • print 
  • large print 
  • braille
  • audio format 
  • an electronic format that's compatible with adaptive technology meant to help people with disabilities. 

By email: tc.accessibility-accessibilite.tc@tc.gc.ca

By mail:

Accessibility Plan Alternate Format Request 
Transport Canada 
Tower C, Place de Ville 
330 Sparks St 
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N5 

By phone:

Toll-free: 1-866-995-9737 
Telephone: 613-990-2309 
TTY: 1-888-675-6863 

Alternate formats will be provided as soon as feasible after the request is received but not later than: 

  • For Braille or an audio format: 45 days after the day that the request is received. 
  • For any other format: On the 15th day after the day that the request is received.

Acknowledgements

We want to thank everyone who participated in our consultations. Without learning about those lived experiences, we wouldn't be able to reach our goal of being barrier free by 2040.

Message from the Deputy Minister

Under the Accessible Canada Act, every federally regulated entity is required to publish an accessibility plan by December 31, 2022. This is our plan to reduce, remove, or eliminate barriers to accessibility at Transport Canada.

Whether you're a public servant, a visitor to one of our facilities, or member of the public accessing our programs and services, there shouldn't be any barriers that keep you from participating fully. Accessibility must be considered in all our policies and our actions.

In September 2022, we ran a survey asking employees to help us identify and address accessibility barriers that could impact the department. The survey's results highlighted priority areas and existing tools and resources. Our national working group for accessibility and our Corporate Services Branch developed this Accessibility Plan to address these issues.

This plan will guide us in our path forward. With this plan, we will continue to build momentum and expand our understanding of what we need to do to make sure we meet the government-wide goal of being barrier-free by January 1, 2040. This plan identifies concrete actions that we will take to address the priority areas outlined in the Accessible Canada Act.

To truly succeed in what we do as a department, we have to grow, make progress, and adapt, to provide an accessible setting for everyone. Over time, we've learned from feedback from within our organization and external partners. We understand the current state of accessibility, and we're committed to reducing and eliminating barriers faced by people with disabilities.

As we work towards this goal, we will continue to work with senior leaders, employees, experts, and members of the public to make sure that accessibility is never an afterthought in anything we do. We will also work with other government organizations and external partners to make sure we're using best practices and learning from others.

We take our responsibilities to Canadians very seriously, particularly in terms of upholding our public service values of respect and inclusion. I'm proud of the work Transport Canada has done to improve accessibility, and I'm confident that this excellent work will continue.

Michael Keenan (he, him, il)
Deputy Minister of Transport

Executive summary

The purpose of the Accessible Canada Act is to make Canada barrier-free by January 1, 2040. This involves identifying, removing and preventing barriers in federal jurisdiction in several of priority areas.

A “barrier” is anything that keeps a person with a disability from participating fully and equally in society. A “disability” is any physical, mental, intellectual, cognitive, learning, communication or sensory impairment or functional limitation.

Federally regulated entities are required to produce a plan to address any barriers or limitations they find in these priority areas:

  • employment
  • built environment
  • information and communication technology
  • communication, other than information and communication technology
  • procuring goods, services and facilities
  • designing and delivering programs and services
  • transportation

This plan outlines concrete actions that will help us take our first steps toward becoming accessible by default. Transport Canada is committed to working with all of you, our senior leaders, our employees, and members of the public to create a place that applies an accessibility lens to every context, both internally and externally.

The COVID-19 pandemic sped our journey towards a barrier-free workplace and service-delivery model. To adapt to the pandemic, we launched many new tools that put accessibility both into the spotlight and under the microscope.

Historically, it's been hard for employees with disabilities to get support for telework. When the pandemic hit, we all began working from home and were quickly given the resources we needed.

To continue this momentum, we will address barriers in our hiring practices so we can contribute to the government's goal of hiring 5,000 people with disabilities by 2025.

We're also committed to improving our approach to workplace accommodations. As part of this we will develop a framework that makes sure managers understand they are responsible for supporting their employees and implementing suitable workplace adjustments.

We're committed to gathering feedback from, and working with, people with disabilities as we:

  • develop new programs and services, and
  • evaluate the existing tools and services

We will also develop and/or promote training on accessibility topics.

Lastly, we're committed to Canada's Disability Inclusion Action Plan. We're contributing to this plan through research in several areas to make sure that the federal transportation network is accessible to all.

Accessibility statement

Transport Canada is committed to addressing barriers and limits that impact people with disabilities by implementing this accessibility plan. We've been guided by the principles behind the Office of Public Service Accessibility “Nothing Without Us” strategy and the Accessible Canada Act.

We will consult and make sure any new initiative is developed through an accessibility lens. This will help us make sure that we consider all relevant views in the first phases of a project or procurement process.

This plan is our first step towards making sure that we reduce or remove the barriers that people with disabilities face so that everyone can fully participate in our programs and services.

We value diversity and inclusion, and understand it's important that our policies, practices, programs, and services are accessible.

Though we have work to do, we're committed to meeting the Government of Canada's goal of being barrier free by January 1, 2040.

Employment

Transport Canada is committed to building a diverse and inclusive workplace because we know our employees are key to the work that we do.

Hiring

We're committed to recruiting and developing people with disabilities. We will develop a strategy to meet or exceed the workforce availability of 8.2%.

This strategy will contribute to the government's goal of hiring 5,000 people with disabilities by 2025 and help make sure that our workforce represents Canada's population.

We will meet this goal by using existing tools, and teaching hiring managers about them. This includes:

  • promoting our internal tool kit on hiring people with disabilities
  • holding targeted recruitment processes
  • promoting existing hiring pools of people with disabilities
  • evaluating current hiring practices and making changes to reduce barriers that impact people with disabilities, and
  • evaluating and improving our employee onboarding process to make sure all new employees know about the tools and resources that can help them

Accommodations

We know that to meet our goals, our employees need access to the right tools and resources.

We already know that the process to access adaptive tools or assistive devices through the duty to accommodate is a barrier. We're committed to reviewing and improving how we deliver this service, including making the process faster and clearer.

We will reach this goal by reviewing our current approach on duty to accommodate, and teach employees about this duty. We will also switch to an employee-centric and case management approach.

To do so, we will consider:

  • piloting the Government of Canada Workplace Accessibility Passport
  • creating a Center of Expertise for managing the accommodation process
  • creating a centralized fund for accommodations that need alternate equipment (like furniture, software, hardware and other specialized equipment)
  • creating clear guidelines and resources for managers that explain their roles and responsibilities and where they can get expert advice on supporting employees and clients with disabilities
  • updating Transport Canada's internal web content to include information on accessibility and support for people with disabilities

End goal

We're an employer of choice. Our hiring process is as accessible as possible.

Once someone is hired they can easily find:

  • meaningful ways to contribute to their teams
  • the tools and resources that they need, and
  • opportunities that will help them grow, develop, and stay at Transport Canada

The built environment

There are Transport Canada offices in around 60 government-owned and leased buildings across Canada. Although we've tried to create a welcoming, accessible, and inclusive work environment, the 2018 Canadian Standards Association's Code Requirements for Accessibility has given us a chance to update our existing worksites to make sure they comply with best practices.

We will use a phased approach over 10 years to do an environmental scan and work with the Rick Hansen Foundation on assessing some facilities to improve accessibility.

Based on existing and planned capital projects, we will renovate prioritized offices to be more accessible. It's important to note that these projects rely on our collaboration with key stakeholders, including Public Services and Procurement Canada, Shared Services Canada and building owners.

We expect to first focus on high impact renovations that have low costs, and complete larger-scale upgrades over the long term.

When designing and modernizing office spaces, we will consult people with disabilities to make sure coverage, functionality, and usability of accessibility elements. We've already rolled-out some accessibility features that exceed the code requirements.

We will promote these accessible office spaces, as well as the teams that can help employees with their accessibility needs. Facilities Officers will receive an Accessibility Certification from the Rick Hanson Foundation, which will help us build capacity within the department.

We also own and operate a number of airports and marine ports across the country. These facilities (terminals, wharfs, hangers etc.) are mostly managed by industry, government and regulatory clients like airport authorities and ferry operators. When possible, we will work with our partners to improve these spaces.

End goal

The properties, facilities, and worksites that we lease or own are inclusive and accessible.

Information and communication technology

As society relies more and more on sharing and communicating information digitally, we'll work to make sure that accessibility is considered from the start of every project. We want to make sure that our information and communications technology products, services and digital content can be accessed and used by all.

We know it's important that everyone, including people with disabilities, can access what they need through our websites, communications, software and hardware.

To make sure there's barrier-free access to our information and communication technology, we're committed to:

  • developing an accessibility testing policy for the information and communication technologies we use. We also plan to review and update the policy as needed
  • developing accessibility guidance checklists and documents for employees that are building or procuring information technology
  • developing accessibility training sessions for employees that are building or procuring information technology
  • assessing existing software, hardware, and other tools to confirm they're accessible and work well with adaptive technologies
  • consulting people with disabilities to learn about the barriers they face that impact their ability to access information and communication technologies
  • consulting people with disabilities when we procure or build new information technology solutions to make sure that accessibility considerations are included in the business requirements
  • creating a place where product teams can share their lessons learned and share information

Communication, other than information and communication technology

When asked, we commit to providing these alternate formats as soon as possible and within time frames listed in the Accessible Canada Regulations and the Accessible Transportation Planning and Reporting Regulations subsection 7(1) and 7(2)alternate formats of our plan can be requested in:

  • print
  • large print
  • braille
  • audio format
  • an electronic format that's compatible with adaptive technology meant to help people with disabilities.

By email: tc.accessibility-accessibilite.tc@tc.gc.ca

By mail:

Accessibility Plan Alternate Format Request 
Transport Canada  
Tower C, Place de Ville 
330 Sparks St 
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N5  

By phone:

Toll-free: 1-866-995-9737 
Telephone: 613-990-2309 
TTY: 1-888-675-6863 

Alternate formats will be provided as soon as feasible after the request is received but not later than: 

  • For Braille or an audio format: 45 days after the day that the request is received. 
  • For any other format: On the 15th day after the day that the request is received.

Procuring goods, services, and facilities

Procurement is a part of meeting our accessibility goals. Recently our Procurement Group made changes to so that accessibility considerations are built into the request process.

We will try to make sure our partners and clients consider accessibility requirements at the start of a procurement process. This will help make sure our goods and services will be accessible, and help the procurement process go quickly.

To make sure that we practice accessible procurement, we will:

  • create a training framework for everyone involved in the procurement process (including project and responsibility center managers) to streamline the consideration process and teach others about accessibility standards
  • promote Public Services and Procurement Canada's training on better buying for government procurement partners
  • create an accountability framework for procurement partners to make sure they're understand the accessibility considerations for different goods and services

End goal

Our employees and clients can access the tools and resources that they need to interact with us in the fullest way possible.

Designing and delivering programs and services

We're committed to reviewing and developing programs and services through an accessibility lens.

To do this, we will:

  • consult people with disabilities when we develop or review programs or services
  • hold training sessions to teach others about existing accessibility standards
  • develop and launch standard templates to make sure all official information is as accessible as possible

End goal

Our programs and services are designed and delivered in a way that everyone can access, especially people with disabilities. We make sure that everyone who interacts with us is satisfied with the accessibility of our programs and services.

Transportation

Transportation regulations and policy

As the policy lead on accessible transportation, we've worked closely with the Canadian Transportation Agency to develop the Accessible Transportation Planning and Reporting Regulations to make sure they align with the Accessible Canada Act's guiding framework and principles.

The Accessible Transportation Planning and Reporting Regulations set out planning and reporting requirements for transportation services providers, including Transport Canada.

We're working on several research projects to:

  • better understand gaps in transportation systems
  • study the accessibility of cab and carpooling services and air travel
  • study barriers like access to affordable transportation and how they can impact equity groups in Canada

We're also looking for innovative ways to safely contain and transport mobility aids on small aircraft. Once these research programs are complete, we will share our lessons learned and provide recommendations on best practices.

We've also been working with the National Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Transportation Agency on a report on the impact COVID-19 had on people with disabilities using the national transportation network.

Transport Canada as a transportation service provider

This section of the plan addresses how Transport Canada, as an airport terminal operator, will identify and remove barriers that could impact the accessibility of an air terminal building.

As a transportation service provider, Transport Canada is subject to the Personnel Training for the Assistance of People with disabilities Regulations. These regulations apply to most terminal operators in Canada. Canadian law also requires a number of our airports to follow the reporting requirements of the PTR and the Accessible Transportation Planning and Reporting Regulations.

For information on a specific air carrier or service providers accessibility plan, including ground transportation providers (like car rental agencies and taxis), please contact them directly.

Training

Training employees is a key part of making travel accessible. We want to make sure that anyone that interacts with the public, provides physical help, handles mobility aids, and helps with special equipment or aids are trained on their responsibilities under the PTR.

While we're not required to train employees on areas outside of their responsibility, we make sure that any companies that operate at our airports comply with the regulations. We do this by asking them to confirm that their employees have completed the training.

All our occupancy agreements (leases and licences) also include a clause that requires companies that operate at our airports to comply with the regulatory requirements of the Canada Transportation Act. This includes making sure that all employees are trained on their responsibilities under the PTR.

New airport staff are trained on accessibility within their first 60 days of work, and we offer refresher training every 2 years. We also keep training records to make sure employees are trained as required.

Most personnel employed at one of our airports are trained online via program from the Canadian Transportation Agency. Their 45-minute training covers topics like:

  • best practices for communicating with travellers
  • helping travelers with disabilities, including the deaf, deafened or hard of hearing
  • helping a traveler who is blind or partially sighted
  • what services to offer people with disabilities, and
  • helping with mobility

Some transportation companies may have other training that they provide directly to their employees.

Transport Canada air terminals

Our air terminals are aging and we're looking to make major changes to protect the health and safety of travellers. We want to make sure our facilities are built to today's building codes and standards, and that they include accessible features when possible.

As our air terminals near the end of their lifecycle, we will identify projects that can remove or reduce accessibility barriers within these facilities. It's important to note that this work will be challenging due to our airports' size and location, especially when it comes to accessing certain services.

All procurement will be guided by the Directive on the Management of Procurement. This directive will make sure that the goods and services we procure are accessible to all Canadians.

We already know about a number of existing barriers at our air terminals

Table 1: Known barriers at Transport Canada air terminals

Barrier

How to reduce or remove it

No or poor quality signage for key features like accessible parking spaces, travel pathways, entrance doors, service desks, evacuation plan, washrooms etc.

Add tactile signage and large, high contrast text when possible.

No or poorly identified passenger drop-off and pick-up zones including shelter and seating areas.

Provide a dedicated curb ramp at all sites with a level change.

Hard to navigate to, from and within air terminal.

Improve texture contrast, colour contrast of signage. Add new fixtures or furniture to improve flow and safety.

No or poor quality accessible washrooms.

Add accessible toilets and sinks, grab bars, automated doors and dispensers.

Communication with the client isn't always accessible.

Make sure communication includes alternate formats. Add accessible public phones or assistive listening devices, etc.

We will also work to reduce or remove barriers by:

  • making sure accessibility is considered in any terminal improvement project, especially when we develop the project's requirements
  • sharing and using accessible procurement principles, rules, and practices, when possible
  • working with Shared Services Canada to make sure our facilities have reliable internet service and Wi-Fi
  • making sure that removing snow and ice from walking paths is prioritized

End goal

As a transportation service provider, we provide a barrier-free environment.

Transport Canada's culture

Transport Canada has had a Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan since 2001. Through this plan and a series of employee networks we are:

  • building an inclusive and diverse workforce that respects everyone
  • encouraging employees to self-identify as members of employment equity groups to make sure that we have accurate data
  • encouraging employees to participate in both internal and interdepartmental equity networks, including our new People with Disabilities Network
  • using a zero tolerance approach for disrespectful behaviour
  • using a rigorous process to investigate discrimination that's in line with the Public Service Code of Conduct and Values and Ethics

We will continue to change our organization's culture by:

  • including people with disabilities and teaching employees about the barriers they face 
  • use best practices, research, and guidelines from the Treasury Board Secretariat
  • making sure that all communication, discussion and engagement with employees is accessible by default, including governance, Transport Canada Talks, and townhalls 
  • making sure everyone can access our events
  • addressing barriers or limitations that affect people with disabilities and keep them from participating fully our department
  • encouraging staff to take diversity and inclusion training from the Canada School of Public Service

End goal

Our employees understand what accessibility means and why it matters. They have the tools to make us a more accessible and inclusive employer and service provider.

Consultations

We used a number of methods to get feedback as we developed this plan, including:

  • meeting with an executive-level working group that advocated for issues being faced by people with disabilities
  • running an employee survey
  • speaking with other departments to learn their best practices
  • participating in communities of practice to learn about projects and programs being from other departments
  • creating an internal working group to identify barriers and develop a plan to reduce or remove those barriers

Throughout our consultations, employees noted many barriers that have kept them from participating fully within the department. This feedback helped us develop the action items listed in this plan. Here's some of what we heard:

Accommodation delays have a major impact on a person with a disability's ability to participate fully in their workplace.

“There is no established procedure for requesting and documenting accommodation, and employees and managers are forced to create the process every time an accommodation is needed. The lack of tools and process lead to confusion and unnecessary delays in approving accommodation requests.”

Lack of understanding and attitudinal barriers (behaviour, views, or assumptions that discriminate against people with disabilities) can impact someone's willingness to ask for help or work at Transport Canada.

“There is a lack of awareness and empathy that is required to support the needs of people with disabilities and this impacts their ability to secure developmental opportunities.”

Even small changes can have huge impact

"Simple changes can have big impact, especially when they are "in your face" and conveniently available, or so well designed that people don't even realize the intentional design."

Appendix A: Summary of actions and responsible Office of Primary Interest

Action Who is responsible for this task? Date complete Status Progress
Launch targeted recruitment processes and promote existing pools of people with disabilities Human Resources TBD Ongoing

Internal Communications (IC) regularly promotes staffing programs available to hiring managers for different equity-seeking groups, including persons with disabilities and Indigenous employees.

Transport Canada has conducted 3 targeted hiring processes specific for Persons with Disabilities (CR-04/CR-05/AS-01, AS-02, and EC-02)

Evaluate our current hiring practices and make changes to reduce any barriers faced by people with disabilities Human Resources TBD Ongoing

Regional Director and Managers are incorporating the GBA+ practices to reduce barriers in staffing processes were possible.

Training is being established on assessment accommodations in staffing processes to make sure candidates with or without disabilities are provided with accommodations if needed. It is for all grounds of discrimination under the Human Rights Act. This training will be adapted from Public Service Commission training and will be available to TC employees in 2024.

The following tools have been provided to assist hiring managers with the hiring and inclusion of persons with disabilities at TC: Hiring Persons with disabilities – Information for Managers (RDIMS: 17972851): Find available resources to help with successfully recruiting persons with disabilities at Transport Canada. (only available to TC employees)

Hire persons with disabilities: Discover how Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)'s campaign is providing information, tools and support to help create an inclusive workplace.

Hiring persons with disabilities: Managers toolkit: Make use of this toolkit with resources for public service managers and HR professionals looking to hire persons with disabilities.

Guide for assessing persons with disabilities: Consult this guideline aimed at modifying assessment tools and procedures to accommodate the needs of persons with disabilities.

Creating a welcoming workplace for employees with disabilities: Refer to this guide and its strategies for creating a welcoming work environment for people with disabilities.

Federal Internship Program for Canadians with disabilities: Learn more about this national program offering 2-Year internship opportunities in support of the Government of Canada's Accessibility Strategy.

Employment opportunity for students with disabilities: Get to know the national support initiative featuring onboarding, training, mentorship, activities, and support services for students with disabilities and their hiring managers.

Assessment accommodation: Discover how assessment accommodations are designed to remove barriers to a fair assessment and allow candidates to demonstrate their competency.

Evaluate and improve our employee onboarding process to make sure all new employees know about the tools and resources that can support them  Human Resources TBD Ongoing TC is currently working on creating an information hub for employees and managers to access important information pertaining to accommodations in the work place.
Evaluate the need for a centralized accommodations fund for employees that need require alternate equipment (like furniture, software, hardware or other specialized equipment) Human Resources TBD Ongoing Transport Canada is currently evaluating the implementation for a centralized fund to ensure all employees are given access to tools and resources to effectively perform their duties.
Set clear guidelines for managers on their roles and responsibilities for supporting employees and clients with disabilities, including where they can get expert advice Human Resources TBD Ongoing Tools are developed and being prepared for publication to our internal site.
Update our web content on accessibility and people with disabilities Human Resources TBD Ongoing

The following documents are available to employees to access resources and templates:

  • Considering inclusion and accessibility
  • Accessibility on the web
  • Accessibility tips and tricks

Internal Communications revamped the diversity and inclusion section on the intranet, updating existing content and adding information related to all equity-seeking groups, including persons with disabilities like hiring tools and resources for creating an inclusive team . The site includes a section on accommodation and promotes useful resources related to increasing diversity in the workplace, through inclusive hiring and getting involved in employee networks.

Internal Communications also regularly promotes learning opportunities for employees, such as events for National AccessAbility Week and the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, as well as training offered by the Accessibility, Accommodation and Adaptive Computer Technology team at Shared Services.

Do an environmental scan and work with the Rick Hansen Foundation to assess the technical accessibility of some of our facilities. We will also identify gaps and best practices to improve accessibility in the workplace Facilities TBD Ongoing

In 2023, the department initiated an accessibility study, in collaboration with the Rick Hansen Foundation, which is aimed at identifying and addressing site gaps in Transport Canada's built environment. The study has been ongoing, and significant strides have been made to enhance the office's accessibility and address various deficiencies.

In 2023 four (4) officeshave been assessed through this process.

Work with property management companies and Public Services and Procurement to make sure that all current and new worksites meet our standard of accessibility  Facilities TBD Ongoing The findings of the accessibility study have been shared with the PSPC (Public Services and Procurement Canada) property management team. This collaboration ensures that the property management team is well-informed about the identified gaps, enabling them to proactively address issues during site renewal. Specifically, the study has focused on highlighting base building deficiencies within the office space.
Develop an accessibility testing policy and review it regularly Service and Digital Group TBD Ongoing We are in the process of developing a policy that is aligned with the current standards set by TBS digital standards and the Canada Accessibility Act.
Develop an accessibility guidance, checklist and documents for employees that are building or procuring information technology Service and Digital Group TBD Ongoing We have created technical guidance checklist, and best practices documents for the technical teams to follow how to support their testing and development work as it pertains to different areas of accessibility and required standards. We plan to publish this information widely in the Fall.
Develop an accessibility training session for employees that are building or procuring information technology Service and Digital Group TBD Ongoing We have developed the training content. We are actively seeking a team within TC that can produce, script and record the training material with us.
Assess existing software and hardware to confirm they're accessible and interact well with adaptive technologies Service and Digital Group TBD Ongoing TC has over 400+ applications to test, we have taken a matrix prioritization (through APM data) approach to selecting the applications to test first. We are providing the results to the application leads for remediation. Currently we have completed 5 application testing. As of August we have 1 tester onboard and bringing 2-4 more testers in Q3. Our goal is to complete external facing/mission critical applications and then focus on the remainder. We anticipate this work will take us most of 2024 to complete as the resources are mostly non-personnel and take time to find expertise and onboard.
Collect feedback from people with disabilities both inside and outside of the department to learn about the barriers or roadblocks they face All TBD Ongoing Internal Communications collaborated with HR DIAT on the Employment Systems Review and promoted associated focus groups to increase response rates/participation; promoted the Accessibility Survey and National Survey on Accessibility in the Built Environment.
Consult people with disabilities when we procure or build new information technology solutions to make sure that we include accessibility considerations in our business requirements. Service and Digital Group TBD Ongoing

We have consulted with outside parties that can provide PWD to test products developed by TC. We have not engaged a contractual vehicle yet as we are still assessing how to manage that centrally.

Consultations on accessibility between Internal Communications and web accessibility specialists are ongoing, and will continue to evolve to include broader perspectives.

Create a repository of accessibility results so product teams can share lessons learned Service and Digital Group TBD Ongoing We have initiated a SharePoint Site to direct all traffic to engaged in development and Quality testing of applications as well as project leads and business stakeholders. As content is completed we will publish it out to our teams through this site.
Create a training framework that trains everyone involved in the procurement process on accessibility standards. This will help project managers and responsibility center manager's identify and consider accessibility at the start of a procurement process Training and Learning TBD Ongoing

As we work towards or goal of ensuring employees and clients can access the tools and resources that they need to interact with us in the fullest way possible we have implemented the following:

  • Implementation of mandatory Accessibility in procurement form to document what accessibility considerations were made for all procurements.
  • Updated our accessible procurement information hub on our internal website.
Promote training from the Canada School of Public Service Procurement TBD Ongoing

CSPS training has been promoted to employees, for example, on the GC Accessibility Training and Events Intranet page.

Internal Communications has promoted CSPS training as well as learning events and products through our TC this week email newsletter.

Communicate and train everyone involved in the procurement process to make sure they understand the accessibility considerations for various goods and services Procurement,  Training and Learning TBD Ongoing Internal Communications has established internal processes and standards aimed at ensuring that every products that we produce is accessible, including through the use of high contrast colours, alt text for images, and plain language. The team also advises clients on how they can make their own products accessible, including through the promotion of available training.
Develop new programs and services through an “accessibility lens” Programs TBD Ongoing  
Communicate and train employees on accessibility standards for existing tools Programs TBD Ongoing  
Create standard templates to make sure all official information is as accessible as possible Programs, Web services, Governance TBD Ongoing

Standard templates and tips are shared with employees on our intranet. For example:

  • Considering inclusion and accessibility
  • Accessibility tips and tricks

Internal Communications has established internal templates and processes aimed at ensuring that every products that we produce is accessible, including through the use of high contrast colours, alt text for images, and plain language. They also advocate for the use of web pages rather than Word files or pdfs, where appropriate, as the HTML format at TC meets accessibility requirements. TC's Web Services provides guidance on web and document accessibility, and has provided additional training to the Internal Communications team to further strengthen understanding and application of accessibility standards in our work.

Work to build an inclusive and diverse workforce that's respectful of all All employees TBD Ongoing Web Services provides advice, guidance and training to make Word docs accessible.
Encourage employees to self-identify as members of equity groups so we have accurate representation data on our workforce Human Resources and all managers TBD Ongoing

Several call-outs and articles have explained the reasons to self-identify. For example:

  • Self-identification: for you, and about you
  • Self-identification

Transport Canada has implemented a modernized self-identification questionnaire. The new questionnaire expands on the definition of disabilities and allows for an open text box for gender identity. Through our self-identification campaign has increased our identification to 86.2%

Encourage employees to participate in internal and external employment equity networks, including our new People with Disabilities Network All employees TBD Ongoing

A video with André Baril, Lead for persons with disabilities and accessibility was posted on the Intranet and displayed on lobby screens. Articles have promoted our network:

  • Network for Persons with Disabilities (tc.gc.ca)
  • National Accessibility Week (tc.gc.ca)

Internal Communications and the Diversity and Inclusion Action Team has promoted the network and its initiatives throughout the year (events, messaging, calls to action)

Have zero tolerance for disrespectful behaviour. Fully investigate accusations of discrimination  All employees TBD Ongoing  
Communicate with/teach employees about the barriers people with disabilities face All employees TBD Ongoing

Examples of articles written to raise awareness about barriers people face include:

  • Considering inclusion and accessibility
  • National Accessibility Week

A session on June 1st with Joshua Frame discussed an employee-centered approach to accommodation, to make TC's workplace work for everyone.

Use best practices, research, and guidelines from the Treasury Board Secretariat All employees TBD Ongoing

TBS and other resources are routinely shared on our internal channels:

  • Considering inclusion and accessibility
  • Microsoft 365 Accessibility Tools
Make sure Transport Canada events are as accessible as possible All employees TBD Ongoing

We have published information to support employees who are organizing events.

  • Considering inclusion and accessibility
  • Accessibility tips and tricks

As part of its event planning process for TC-wide events, the department secures simultaneous translation in both official languages. Every invitation to TC-wide events includes an active offer for accommodation - such as the need for ASL or LSQ interpretation - as well as a reminder that employees are expected to remain respectful in their interactions during the event. Internal Communications also advises on potential communication barriers that may exist during in-person events and makes recommendations.

Make sure that all communication, discussion and engagement with employees is accessible by default. This  includes governance, Transport Canada Talks, and townhalls All employees TBD Ongoing

We have published information to support employees who are organizing events. Sign language interpretation is increasingly included in all staff meetings such as TC Talks and Townhalls. A process is in place to procure the services and inform employees that it is available.

  • Considering inclusion and accessibility
  • Accessibility tips and tricks

Internal Communications works to ensure all images, text and other elements of our newsletter and email communications are accessible with the inclusion of alt-text, the use of plain language, and the promotion of built-in accessibility features, such as text-to-speech and colour options in TC This Week. Internal Communications advises on potential communication barriers that may exist during in-person events and makes recommendations. Simultaneous translation, ASL and QSL are available to employees who request these services.

Address barriers or limitations that affect people with disabilities and keep them from participating fully with the department All employees TBD Ongoing Since the publication of the feedback form in December 2022 eighteen (18) submissions have been received. At this time, all submissions are considered resolved.
Create a way for people with disabilities to participate in developing any new tools, resources, programs or services All employees TBD Ongoing  
Encourage and promote all accessibility-related training from the Canada School of Public Service All managers, Training and Learning TBD Ongoing

Training is routinely promoted in TC this Week (weekly newsletter to all employees) and a permanent link to the School's resources is located on the Creating an accessible and inclusive workplace page, in the side bar

Internal Communications has promoted training through CSPS courses (e.g. Disability Management and Workplace Wellness, Advancing Employment Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities)

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