Projects funded by the Program to Advance Connectivity and Automation in the Transportation System

The following groups have received funding from the Program to Advance Connectivity and Automation in the Transportation System.

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  • Canadian National Institute for the Blind

    Announced on

    June 7, 2018

    Project description

    To study the impacts of connected and automated vehicles on pedestrians with sight loss.

    Total funding

    $50,000

    Project status

    Completed in August 2019.

    Results achieved

    The Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) studied how vulnerable users, like pedestrians with sight loss, will be impacted by connected and automated vehicles. This information was captured in CNIB's report which includes 7 recommendations to help develop national and international policies.

  • CSA Group

    Announced on

    August 10, 2018

    Project description

    To develop guidelines and a standardization plan to safely deploy connected and automated vehicle technologies in Canada.

    Total funding

    $499,999

    Project status

    In progress.

    Results achieved

    CSA Group established a Connected and Automated Vehicle Advisory Council, made up of experts across industry, academia and all levels of government in both Canada and the United States. The council was created to develop a standardization roadmap for the safe deployment of connected and automated vehicles in Canada. CSA Group is also developing a guideline that will help develop a bi-national code to promote consistent infrastructure design and operations for emerging vehicle technologies .

  • Canadian Urban Transit Research and Innovation Consortium

    Announced on

    August 10, 2018

    Project description

    To look at integrating automated and electric transit shuttles in 9 communities across Canada.

    Total funding

    $144,540

    Project status

    Completed in January 2020.

    Results achieved

    The Canadian Urban Transit Research and Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC) modeled routes for the use of electric low-speed automated shuttles in 9 Canadian jurisdictions. This modelling helped the consortium analyze feasibility, route timing, charging requirements, energy consumption and ridership. These models can help municipalities better understand how the shuttles could be used in their jurisdictions and how they could impact their transit systems.

  • City of Calgary

    Announced on

    June 7, 2018

    Project description

    To test an automated shuttle to connect light rail transit between the Calgary Zoo and Telus Spark Science Centre.

    Total funding

    $50,000

    Project status

    Completed in March 2019.

    Results achieved

    The City of Calgary deployed an automated shuttle in September 2018. The shuttle was self- driving, could carry 10-12 passengers and traveled at low speed (around 12km/h) on a dedicated gravel roadway. The shuttle moved 4,500 members of the public during the trial. The pilot was seen as a success, and the City found a number of positive outcomes, and lessons learned, which can be found in the City of Calgary's final report.

  • City of Calgary

    Announced on

    June 7, 2018

    Project description

    To create a connected vehicle test bed along 16th Avenue North in Calgary.

    Total funding

    $290,000

    Project status

    In progress.

    Results achieved

    The City of Calgary created a connected vehicle test bed corridor to test connected vehicle technologies, support shorter travel times for emergency vehicles, and reduce the risk of collisions. The City successfully installed connected vehicle equipment at 16 intersections along 16th Avenue North, and is in the process of testing the equipment installed in 4 emergency vehicles.

  • City of Saskatoon

    Announced on

    May 29, 2018

    Project description

    To build the City's understanding of connected and automated vehicles.

    Total funding

    $25,000

    Project status

    In progress.

    Results achieved

    The City of Saskatoon is improving city staff's abilities to learn, improve and keep skills and knowledge related to connected and automated vehicles. Staff have attended conferences on services, infrastructure, policy, privacy, training on traffic controls, and learned about the considerations of connected and automated vehicles.

  • City of Toronto

    Announced on

    August 10, 2018

    Project description

    To pilot an automated transit shuttle on public roads.

    Total funding

    $365,000

    Project status

    In progress.

    Results achieved

    The City of Toronto, Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), and Metrolinx will launch a trial public transit service to connect local residents to and from Rouge Hill GO station using an electric automated shuttle. On October 14, 2020, the City announced that it had signed an agreement with Local Motors to provide the temporary trial service with an Olli 2.0 vehicle. Although the trial has been delayed due to COVID-19, the project team is working towards launching in spring 2021. Further information on the project is available on the City of Toronto's website.

  • City of Vancouver

    Announced on

    August 10, 2018

    Project description

    To create an urban connected and automated vehicle testing strategy for future trials and use, focusing on civic fleets and road infrastructure.

    Total funding

    $386,500

    Project status

    In progress.

    Results achieved

    The City of Vancouver researched global trends and hosted sessions and workshops to prepare for connected and automated vehicles, electric vehicles, and shared vehicles. The City developed a toolkit to engage, educate, and inform staff on connected and automated vehicles. The City is also developing a project plan including goals, and key performance indicators for a future connected and automated vehicle pilot project.

  • Intelligent Transportation System Society of Canada

    Announced on

    August 10, 2018

    Project description

    To update planning tools that help Canadian transportation professionals deploy smart roadway infrastructure (e.g. equipment to communicate with connected vehicles).

    Total funding

    $247,275

    Project status

    Completed in March 2020.

    Results achieved

    The ITS Architecture for Canada is a framework for planning, defining, and integrating Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). The Intelligent Transportation System Society of Canada recently completed Version 3 update to the ITS Architecture for Canada. The update realigns the Canadian architecture with the U.S. Architecture Reference for Cooperative and Intelligent Transportation (ARC-IT). More information can be found on the ITS Canada website.

  • Ministry of Transportation of Ontario

    Announced on

    August 10, 2018

    Project description

    To support planning and capacity for connected and automated vehicles in the greater Toronto and Hamilton areas, and the Waterloo corridor.

    Total funding

    $111,025

    Project status

    Completed in March 2020.

    Results achieved

    In April 2020, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation released the Connected and Automated Vehicle (CAV) Readiness Plan Report for the greater Toronto and Hamilton areas and Kitchener-Waterloo Corridor. Over 73 municipal transportation stakeholders provided input and key insights on challenges and needs related to connected and automated vehicles. Following the completion of the project, the Ontario Smart Mobility Readiness Forum was created to support collaboration and to continue these conversations.

  • University of Alberta

    Announced on

    June 25, 2018

    Project description

    To investigate new ways to make sure connected vehicle communications are safe, secure and respect Canadian privacy laws.

    Total funding

    $500,000

    Project status

    In progress.

    Results achieved

    The University of Alberta has successfully tested a technology framework known as the Security Credential Management System, to help keep connected vehicle communications secure. The project is also developing and testing 2 connected vehicles applications, a road weather information system (to warn a driver of bad road conditions) and an eco-application (to reduce transportation's impact on the environment).

  • Canadian Automobile Association (CAA)

    Announced on

    August 29, 2018

    Project description

    To educate consumers about connected and automated vehicle safety technologies.

    Total funding

    $25,000

    Project status

    Completed in May 2019.

    Results achieved

    CAA successfully launched a bilingual online tool, to help educate and raise awareness about connected and automated vehicles among Canadians. The website includes general information about emerging vehicle technologies, a timeline for some driver assistance features, and videos to help Canadians learn about different aspects of connected and automated vehicles. To date, the tool has been viewed more than 600,000 times.

  • Unmanned Systems Canada

    August 29, 2018

    Project description

    To launch a competition to help students learn about automated vehicle technologies.

    Total funding

    $50,000

    Project status

    Completed in May 2019.

    Results achieved

    Unmanned Systems Canada launched Canada's first unmanned ground vehicle student competition, in May 2019, at the Ottawa L5 facility (recently renamed Area X.0). The competition challenged students to develop a scale model of a fully-automated snow plow, and bring their prototype for a face-off competition. Teams from the University of Ottawa and Carleton University built vehicles that were able to sense and avoid obstacles, and use other intelligent technologies.

  • City of Ottawa

    Announced on

    August 29, 2018

    Project description

    To install smart traffic signals to reduce vehicle emissions and improve traffic flow.

    Total funding

    $140,000

    Project status

    Completed in March 2020.

    Results achieved

    The City of Ottawa ran the Eco-Drive II pilot project to investigate the environmental and fuel efficiency benefits of providing City fleet drivers with advanced traffic signal timing information across the City's 1,200 traffic signals. The analysis found that, on average, the fleet of vehicles saved 2.5% of fuel (or 3.24% when idling was removed). Individual drivers saved between 0% to 14+%, depending on how much they used the technology. Read the Eco-Drive II project's final report.

  • Carleton University

    Announced on

    August 29, 2018

    Project description

    To evaluate how connected and automated vehicles will influence road infrastructure design and planning.

    Total funding

    $50,000

    Project status

    Completed in October 2020.

    Results achieved

    Carleton University stud ied the role that road infrastructure and traffic management can play in maximizing the benefits of connected and automated vehicles and manage negative safety impacts. The researchers used computer models to assess traffic management strategies to improve traffic performance and safety at freeway merge areas. This work showed that traffic management can help achieve these goals without making physical road improvements.