Approved Check Pilot (ACP) and Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) Evaluator Bulletin No. 01/18

Applicability

ACP AQP
X  

Subjects

  1. Rotary Wing - Maximum number of approved helicopter types on an ACP ’s accreditation;
  2. Rotary Wing – Pilot Proficiency Checks and recency requirements for helicopter types on an ACP ’s accreditation; and
  3. Rotary Wing - Maximum number of VFR helicopter flight checks per day.

Purpose

  • 1. The purpose of this bulletin is to implement policy changes to the above subject areas to address concerns expressed by numerous companies / ACP s in the VFR helicopter segment.

Background

  • 2. The 10th Edition of the ACP Manual imposed a limit on the maximum number of aircraft types on an ACP accreditation - (there was no limit in the 9th edition). This limit was imposed to achieve better alignment with global standards and practises and, more importantly, to ensure that an ACP could realistically maintain an acceptable level of proficiency on the types authorized on their accreditation.
  • 3. The type limit has introduced challenges for helicopter companies and ACP s in the VFR segment of the industry. This segment is serviced by a wide variety of small single-engine helicopters, and an individual type rating is required to operate each of these helicopters as flight crew. For this reason, it is common for an ACP in this segment to have an operational need for more than five types on their accreditation.
  • 4. For comparison purposes, and to add context to the above situation, an individual type rating is not required to act as flight crew on most fixed-wing aircraft that have a minimum flight crew requirement of one pilot, excluding high performance aircraft. An aeroplane ACP can receive authorization to conduct PPCs on numerous single-crew aeroplanes, and have these aircraft grouped as one type (blanket authority) on their accreditation. Accordingly, it is far more likely that a helicopter ACP will be impacted by the type limit on an ACP accreditation, in comparison to an aeroplane ACP that can use the blanket authority, depending on the segment(s) of the industry they service.
  • 5. Options to address this matter for helicopter ACP s are limited. Allowing additional types on an accreditation carries risks, as does increasing the number of ACP s. Based on a thorough analysis, TCCA has determined that the optimum course of action is to increase the maximum number of helicopter types permitted on an ACP ’s accreditation. This increase is primarily focused on allowing additional single-engine helicopter types on an accreditation, which is a close parallel to the blanket authority that applies to an aeroplane ACP ’s accreditation for single-crew aeroplanes.
  • 6. Single-engine helicopter types are operated single-crew in a VFR environment (with VFR PPCs ), all of which is less complex in comparison to multi-engine IFR operations. Accordingly, the risks associated with having additional single-engine types on an accreditation are considered to be low, and will be partially offset by implementing more robust recency requirements for helicopter ACP s, as defined in this bulletin. Additional risk mitigation will occur through the active monitoring of an ACP ’s performance and safety record, as observed by regional TCCA Issuing Authorities. If it is observed that an ACP is not maintaining a satisfactory level of performance, or safety, the Issuing Authority may choose to reduce the number of types on the ACP ’s accreditation, or take more substantive action if warranted.
  • 7. With respect to the maximum number of flight checks permitted in one day, there is no practical reason to limit VFR helicopter flight checks to the ‘two per day’ maximum stated in the ACP Manual. Changes to this policy are published below.
  • 8. The policy changes in this bulletin focus solely on helicopter operations, which was intentional to allow TCCA to take timely action on ACP issues that are having a significant impact on the VFR segment of the helicopter industry. The next step is to review the same subject areas with respect to aeroplane operations, with an aim of harmonizing aeroplane and helicopter policies, where appropriate.

Policy Changes

  • 9. Section 3.1 (4) of the ACP Manual is superseded by the following changes:
    • a. Approved Aircraft Types - Helicopter
      • (i) An ACP ’s accreditation will specify a maximum of eight (8) aircraft types, based on operational needs, in accordance with the following allocations:
      • Category 1: Multi-Engine Helicopters – maximum three (3) types.
      • Note – Up to two additional types can be approved by the Issuing Authority, if the additional types are variants of one of the other types on the accreditation. For example, if the Bell 212 is one of three approved types on the accreditation, the Bell 412, which is a variant of the Bell 212, can be authorized as a fourth type on the delegation.
      • Category 2: Single-Engine Helicopters – maximum eight (8) types, reduced by one type for each aircraft type that has been authorized in Category 1.
      • (ii) The total number of aircraft types from Category 1 and Category 2 on an ACP ’s accreditation, (including type variants), shall not exceed the maximum authorized total of eight (8) types.
    • b. Possible limitations or factors that could further restrict the maximum number of types on an accreditation.
      • (i) Specific Series / Models of Existing Helicopter Types
        • (a) Some models of existing helicopter types may carry significant differences in comparison to other models captured under the same type rating.
      • (ii) Automation and Technology
        • (a) Models of helicopters equipped with integrated avionics suites, Flight Management Systems, EFIS , RNAV / GPS systems, or other advanced technologies require a high degree of system knowledge by the ACP .
      • (iii) Types and Complexity of Flight Operations
        • (a) For complex flight operations, the use of SOPs becomes increasingly important and requires an ACP to have a comprehensive understanding of the procedures used by the crew being evaluated.
      • (iv) Any other reason deemed significant by Transport Canada, which includes anyconcerns related to the competency, proficiency, or safety related practices of an ACP .
  • 10. Section 4.1 (e) of the ACP Manual is superseded by the following changes:
    • a. Pilot Proficiency Checks – Helicopters
      • (i) A successful annual PPC as pilot-in-command is required on both a multi-engine helicopter type and a single-engine helicopter type, if an ACP is authorized to conduct flight checks on both multi-engine and single-engine helicopters.
      • (ii) If an ACP is only authorized to conduct flight checks on multi-engine helicopters, the ACP is only required to complete a successful annual PPC on a multi-engine helicopter. The same logic applies to ACP s that are only authorized to conduct flight checks on single-engine helicopter types.
      • (iii) The helicopter type(s) selected by an ACP to complete their own PPC (s) is at their discretion, unless the issuing authority directs otherwise to ensure that required competencies are maintained.
      • (iv) An ACP requires a current IFR PPC in order to conduct IFR PPCs . The ACP must also have the appropriate (and current) certifications if evaluating special authorizations, capabilities, or qualifications, such as RNP and/or RNP AR, RVR 1200/600 operations, offshore instrument approaches, heads up display, enhanced vision systems ( EVS ), etc.
    • b. For the remaining aircraft types on an accreditation for which a PPC was not conducted, recency on these types can be achieved through one or more of the following means:
      • (a) For types on the accreditation for which the ACP has 500 flight hours or more on type:
        • (i) Completing 0.5 hours of flight time in a 12-month period on each type of single-engine helicopter (excluding variants), and 1.0 hours of flight time in a 12-month period for each type of multi-engine helicopter (excluding variants), while occupying a seat that has flight controls installed. Flight time includes giving or receiving training in an aircraft, simulator, or approved Flight Training Device; and
        • (ii) Completing recurrent technical ground training on each type, and differences training for variants, once every 24 months.
      • (b) For types on the accreditation for which the ACP has 500 flight hours or less on type:
        • (i) Completing 1.0 hours of flight time in a 12-month period on each type of single-engine helicopter, and 1.5 hours of flight time in a 12-month period for each type of multi-engine helicopter, while occupying a seat that has flight controls installed. Flight time includes giving or receiving training in an aircraft, simulator, or approved Flight Training Device; and
        • (ii) Completing recurrent technical ground training on each type, and differences training for variants, once every 24 months.
    • c. Flight time conducting PPCs does not count towards the above recency requirements.
    • d. An FAA TCE / EASA SFE is required to meet the above recency requirements and flight check requirements ( PPC equivalency).
    • e. An ACP / TCE / SFE must maintain sufficiently detailed records to demonstrate that the above recency requirements have been met. This will be verified during an ACP Monitor check, and at any other time that TCCA chooses to verify recency. An ACP / TCE / SFE is not authorized to conduct a flight check on any aircraft for which recency has not been maintained.
  • 11. The following addition applies to Section 6.19 of the ACP Manual, and for practical purposes can be considered to be 6.19 (1) (c) of that section:
    • a. The maximum number of helicopter VFR flight checks in one day is three.

Effective Dates

  • a. The above changes to sections 3.1 (4) and 6.19 of the ACP Manual take effect immediately.
  • b. The above changes to section 4.1 (e) of the ACP Manual come into effect on 1 November, 2018, which provides ACP s with a reasonable timeframe to transition to the new recency requirements. (Existing policy in section 4.1 (e) remains in effect until it is replaced by the new policy on 1 November, 2018).

Contacts

John Smith
ACP Program Coordinator – Rotary Wing
Commercial Flight Standards
613-769-5421
john.smith@tc.gc.ca

or

Matthew Dillon
ACP Program Coordinator – Fixed Wing
Commercial Flight Standards
613-990-1015
matthew.dillon@tc.gc.ca

Approval

/// signed by ///

Deborah Martin
Chief
Commercial Flight Standards ( AARTF )
613-990-1055
deborah.martin@tc.gc.ca