Transport Canada's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2020 to 2023 - 2022-2023 Update

Executive Summary

Transport Canada seeks to promote a safe, secure, efficient and environmentally responsible transportation system in Canada. Our departmental vision aligns closely with the social, economic and environmental pillars of sustainable development, which is defined as ‘our ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’Footnote 1.

Our national transportation system – by land, water and air – links Canadians to each other and Canada with the world. Transportation moves goods to markets and people to their destinations, provides jobs, and supports economic growth. However, transportation activities can sometimes have negative impacts on the environment, for example - through the release of air pollutants from vehicles which can contribute to poorer air quality or accidental oil spills in the marine environment which can affect water quality and marine species. Of increasing importance, climate change and extreme weather-related events can disrupt the movement of both freight and people, putting the economy and Canadians at risk. Given the complex nature of sustainable transportation issues and its shared jurisdiction, strong and effective partnerships are required with other federal departments, other levels of government, industry, other stakeholders and individual Canadians. A number of our departmental actions, as set out in Section 3, will be undertaken in partnership with others.

At the federal level, a whole-of government Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) is prepared every three years. The 2019 to 2022 FSDS is the federal government’s fourth strategy since the coming into force of the Federal Sustainable Development Act, and it serves as the Government of Canada’s primary vehicle for sustainable development planning and reporting – both to Parliament and Canadians. The 2019 to 2022 FSDS centres on thirteen aspirational goals, with supporting targets and actions, which seek to promote clean growth, ensure healthy ecosystems and build safe, secure and sustainable communities. Furthermore, the FSDS demonstrates federal leadership towards implementing the environmentally-related global United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (Figure 1).

The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals icons
Figure 1 - UN Sustainable Development Goals
Long description

The goals are:

  1. No poverty,
  2. Zero hunger,
  3. Good health and well-being,
  4. Quality education,
  5. Gender equality,
  6. Clean water and sanitation,
  7. Affordable and clean energy,
  8. Decent work and economic growth,
  9. Industry, innovation and infrastructure,
  10. Reduced inequalities,
  11. Sustainable cities and communities,
  12. Responsible consumption and production,
  13. Climate action,
  14. Life below water,
  15. Life on land,
  16. Peace, justice and strong institutions,
  17. Partnerships for the goals.
 

Transport Canada remains committed to contributing to the FSDS and to supporting Canada’s vision for sustainable development. The 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) describes how Transport Canada will continue to contribute to the FSDS: our sustainable development context and vision; the actions we will undertake over the next three years to support the FSDS, and the ways we have integrated a sustainable development approach into our policies, plans and decision-making. Key areas of action presented within this DSDS include: actions under the Whales Initiative to reduce the impacts of marine traffic on endangered marine mammals; activities to lead by example in improving our own operations through increasing efficiencies in how we do business and reducing the energy consumption of the facilities and fleet of vehicles that we own and operate; and initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from the transportation sector, including in support of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (PCF); and Canada’s Strengthened Climate Plan, A Healthy Environment and a Healthy Economy. Announced in December 2020, Canada’s strengthened climate plan builds on continuing work with provinces and territories through the PCF and includes measures to support cleaner modes of transportation, establishing the building blocks to get to net zero by 2050 and exceeding the Government of Canada’s 2030 Paris Agreement emissions target.

As noted in this update, some funding envelopes may be coming to end by March 2022, including under the current Oceans Protection Plan. However, work is currently underway to continue to implement commitments made under the Plan. With the support of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, TC is working to launch a next phase to continue efforts to: deliver world-leading marine safety systems, increase protection for marine species and ecosystems and create stronger partnerships with Indigenous and other coastal communities, while strengthening marine research and science.

Section 1: Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Icônes des Objectifs de la SFDD
Figure 2: FSDS Goals

The 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of this Act to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Transport Canada supports the goals laid out in the FSDS (Figure 2) through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

This DSDS builds on our accomplishments and lessons learned in previous strategies and charts our course of action for the 2020-2023 period. In the spirit of the ‘evergreen’ approach of the 2019 to 2022 FSDS, we update the interactive FSDS e-Strategy and this DSDS as new policy decisions, programs and initiatives that support the FSDS goals or broader United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals emerge. Detailed information about these initial commitments that Transport Canada has made to contribute to the 2019 to 2022 FSDS can be found in Section 3 of this DSDS. Past reporting information on completed initiatives can be found here: Transport Canada’s 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Section 2: Sustainable Development Vision and Context in Transport Canada

To preserve and strengthen Canada's transportation system, transportation policy must provide a framework that addresses the three elements of sustainability - social, economic and environmental. It must also give carriers the opportunity to adapt, innovate, compete and serve shippers and travellers in a way that takes into account each of these elements.

Transport Canada is responsible for the Government of Canada's transportation policies and programs. While not directly responsible for all aspects or modes of transportation, the Department plays a leadership role to ensure that all parts of the transportation system work together effectively.

Our vision is ‘A transportation system in Canada that is recognized worldwide as safe and secure, efficient and environmentally responsible’. This vision of a sustainable transportation system reflects social, economic and environmental objectives. Its three guiding principles are to work towards:

  • the highest possible safety and security of life and property, supported by performance-based standards and regulations;
  • the efficient movement of people and goods to support economic prosperity and a sustainable quality of life, based on competitive markets and targeted use of regulation and government funding; and,
  • respect of the environmental legacy for future generations of Canadians, guided by environmental assessment and planning processes in transportation decisions and selective use of regulation and government funding.

‘Transportation 2030 – A Strategic Plan for the Future of Transportation in Canada’, announced in 2016 by the Minister of Transport, was prepared with views and ideas from Canadians, stakeholders, provinces and territories, and Indigenous groups across the country and reflects sustainable development in its vision of:

“…a safe, secure, green, innovative and integrated transportation system that supports trade and economic growth, a cleaner environment and the well-being of Canada’s middle class”.

Canadians are invited to visit our Transportation 2030 website to view our progress in advancing work under the following five key theme areas:

  1. Enhancing the experience of the Canadian traveller;
  2. Building a safer, more secure transportation system that earns the confidence of Canadians;
  3. Investing in a greener, more innovative transportation sector that embraces new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives;
  4. Protecting Canada’s waterways, coasts and the North; and
  5. Improving Canada’s transportation infrastructure and trade corridors to get products to global markets more efficiently.

Transport Canada continues to actively participate in and support the FSDS. Through this DSDS, the department directly contributes to six of the thirteen long-term goals identified in the 2019 to 2022 FSDS, as follows:

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Goal: Greening Government - Transport Canada has identified a number of measures under the Greening government goal to support the Government of Canada’s target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government facilities and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2025 and 90% below 2005 levels by 2050Footnote 2. These measures include: renovating facilities to be more energy efficient; starting in 2019 to 2020, and where operational needs permit, 100% of new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will must be zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs); incorporating environmental considerations into our procurement processes; and engaging with employees to promote sustainable employee behaviour.

Transport Canada is already making strides towards these goals. The department has seen a 12.4% reduction in GHG emissions from facilities between fiscal year 2005 to 2006 and fiscal year 2019 to 2020, and a 17.8% reduction in GHG emissions from Transport Canada’s fleets over the same period. In 2019 to 2020, 100% of Transport Canada’s new procurement specialists and acquisition cardholders were trained in green procurement using the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course. Of note, the department’s other ambitions under the Greening Government Strategy also complement this DSDS: for example, Transport Canada will continue to update its Carbon Neutral Roadmap on a regular basis and in doing so will prioritize, on a risk basis, its activities that will significantly reduce GHG emissions and will track progress in terms of emissions reductions achieved. A risk management framework is being developed to capture the significant risks to the Department achieving its Greening Government Strategy GHG emission reduction targets and that identifies mitigation measures.

Additionally,Transport Canada continues to demonstrate leadership in its efforts to better understand and address climate risks to the department’s assets, services and operations. In particular, the Transportation Assets Risk Assessment initiative seeks to improve the understanding of climate risks to federal transportation assets and potential adaptation solutions which could be employed.

Climate Change goal icon

FSDS Goal: Effective Action on Climate Change – The transportation sector is Canada’s second largest source of greenhouse gas emissions, accounting for 186 Mt or 25% of the national total in 2019. Reducing these emissions is a key priority of the federal government, as outlined in the set of ambitious and collaborative areas of action under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, and Canada’s strengthened climate plan, A Healthy Environment and a Healthy Economy, announced in December 2020. Transport Canada leads a suite of regulatory and voluntary measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation, marine, and rail sectors, and also supports emission reductions from the on-road sector. The department also represents the Government of Canada at the International Civil Aviation Organization and the International Maritime Organization to develop approaches for the international aviation and marine sectors. The Department also tests clean transportation technologies, so that they may be introduced in a safe, effective and timely manner. In January 2019, new federal targets were announced for sales of zero-emission vehicles in Canada. Many of the actions under this Goal also support the Safe and Healthy Communities FSDS Goal.

Impacts associated with a changing climate and extreme weather are already damaging and disrupting transportation systems, services and operations across all modes and in all regions of Canada. In Northern Canada in particular, climate impacts can threaten the efficiency, safety and resilience of transportation, and consequently, the ability of Northerners and industry to maximize social and economic development.

To support a more climate resilient transportation infrastructure, Transport Canada’s National Trade Corridors Fund supports trade and transportation infrastructure investments that strengthen the efficiency and reliability of Canada’s trade corridors. Additionally, through the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, the department enabled the enhancement of the resilience of existing and future Northern transportation infrastructure and operations to a changing climate.

Clean Growth goal icon

FSDS Goal: Clean Growth – Investments in clean technology and innovation contribute to clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy, resulting in both economic and environmental benefits. Recognizing this, Transport Canada’s “Core Clean Transportation Research, Development and Demonstration – Aviation, Marine and Rail Transportation Program” will address GHG and air pollutant emissions from the aviation, marine and rail transportation sectors through targeted research on emerging technologies and innovative practices.

Healthy Coasts and Oceans goal icon

FSDS Goal: Healthy Coasts and Oceans – Transport Canada is committed to protecting Canada’s coasts and oceans and keeping them healthy for future generations. The department develops and administers policies, regulations and programs to protect the marine environment. In support of this goal, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act received Royal Assent on June 21, 2019, formalizing a crude oil tanker moratorium on British Columbia’s north coast, providing an unprecedented level of environmental protection for this special place and unique ecosystem. This legislation prohibits oil tankers carrying more than 12,500 metric tons of crude oil or persistent oil products as cargo from stopping, loading or unloading at ports or marine installations in the moratorium area.

The Government implemented the Oceans Protection Plan (OPP): a whole-of-government, comprehensive strategy to build a world-leading marine safety system and protect Canada’s marine ecosystems. The OPP included a number of innovative and transformative initiatives that were implemented by five federal organizations under four main priority areas, namely, prevention and response measures related to marine safety, preservation and restoration of marine ecosystems and habitats, building and strengthening partnerships with Indigenous and coastal communities, and ensuring Canada’s marine safety system is built on a stronger evidence base that is supported by science and local knowledge.

As part of the National Strategy to Address Abandoned and Wrecked Vessels, the Government brought into force the Wrecked, Abandoned or Hazardous Vessels Act in July 2019. This Act prohibits irresponsible vessel management, strengthens vessel owner responsibility and liability, and enhances federal powers to take proactive measures on abandoned vessels or wrecks. It also brought into Canadian law the Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, 2007, which strengthens owner liabilities concerning wrecks. As of December 2021, over 380 vessels or wrecks have been addressed under the new Act. This is in addition to approximately 290 vessels or wrecks that have been removed and disposed to date under Transport Canada’s Abandoned Boats Program or the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Small Craft Harbours Abandoned and Wrecked Vessels Removal Program

On June 22, 2018, the Government of Canada announced the $167.4 million Whales Initiative to protect and support the recovery of endangered whale populations across Canada by addressing key threats to the Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW), the North Atlantic Right Whale (NARW) and the St. Lawrence Estuary Beluga. On October 31, 2018, the Government announced a further $61.5M in additional measures focused on broadening and strengthening protection of SRKW in response to the determination that this population faces an imminent threat. Transport Canada continues to implement and refine measures to reduce the risk of physical and acoustic disturbances from vessels such as expanding vessel slowdown zones on the East and West coasts, prohibiting approach distances of less than 400m from the Southern Resident killer whales, establishing Interim Sanctuary Zones for killer whales where vessels are prohibited from entering, taking monitoring and enforcement actions for vessels in mandatory speed restriction areas, and increasing aerial and acoustic detection of whales in Canadian waters.

Lakes and Rivers goal icon

Many of Transport Canada’s actions under the Healthy Coasts and Oceans Goal also support the Pristine Lakes and Rivers Goal.

Communities goal icon

FSDS Goal: Safe and Healthy Communities – Transport Canada is committed to doing its part to ensure that Canadians live in clean, safe environments that contribute to their health and well-being. Pollutant emissions from transportation have fallen significantly, largely due to regulatory changes introduced by the federal government. That being said, further action is required to ensure this trend continues in the transportation sector. Key departmental initiatives under this goal include: regulatory, voluntary and complementary efforts to improve air quality through the reduction of air pollutant emissions from transportation sources; the prevention of environmental emergencies or mitigating their impacts if they do occur; and taking action to remediate our contaminated sites.

This DSDS builds on our accomplishments and lessons learned in previous strategies and charts our course of action for the next three years. In the spirit of the ‘evergreen’ approach of the 2019 to 2022 FSDS, we will update the interactive FSDS e-Strategy and this DSDS as new policy decisions, programs and initiatives that support the FSDS goals or broader United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals emerge. Detailed information about these initial commitments that Transport Canada has made to contribute to the 2019 to 2022 FSDS can be found in Section 3 of this DSDS.

Section 3: Commitments for Transport Canada

Greening Government goal icon

Greening Government: The Government of Canada will transition to low-carbon, climate resilient, and green operations

Responsible Minister: All ministers

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: To implement net-zero in real property and fleet operations, the Government of Canada will reduce Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions by 40% by 2025 and by at least 90% below 2005 levels by 2050Footnote 3

FSDS Contributing Action: All new buildings and major building retrofits will prioritize low-carbon investments based on integrated design principles, and life-cycle and total-cost-of ownership assessments which incorporate shadow carbon pricing
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

All new buildings will be constructed to be net-zero carbon unless a lifecycle cost-benefit analysis indicates net-zero carbon ready construction

Opportunities to implement energy efficiency retrofits in TC buildings will be considered, such as:

  • lighting upgrades (LED lighting)
  • upgrades to buildings envelope (insulation, windows, etc.)
  • reduce plug-load demand
  • initiate energy performance contracts
  • implement recommissioning measures (buildings and systems optimization to improve comfort and save energy)

Starting point:

6.332 ktCO2e for facilities as of 2005 to 2006 baseline year (updated from 5.68 ktCO2e from 2020 to 2023 DSDS)

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities as calculated by:
    • GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005 to 2006 (base year): = 6.332 ktCO2e
    • GHG emissions from facilities in current reporting fiscal year = [Y] ktCO2e
    • percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005 to 2006 to current reporting fiscal year = [Y/X] %

Target:

  • GHG emissions from buildings reduced by 40% by 2025 (2.533 ktCO2e) and 90% by 2050 (5.699 ktCO2e)Footnote 2

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:

Prioritizing low-carbon investment in new constructions and major renovation projects will allow TC to reduce its energy consumption and associated GHG emissions from its real property portfolio and improve the environmental performance of its buildings

By optimizing TC’s buildings and systems, energy consumption and GHG emissions will be reduced

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 9 – Industry Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13 – Climate Action

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

FSDS Contributing Action: Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced

Starting point:

1.717 ktCO2e, GHG emissions from Transport Canada light-duty, unmodified on-road vehicle fleet in 2005 to 2006 (updated from 56 ktCO2e from 2020 to 2023 DSDS)

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage change in GHG emissions from fleets as calculated by:
    • GHG emissions from fleets in fiscal year 2005 to 2006 (base year): = 41.717 ktCO2e
    • GHG emissions from fleets in current reporting fiscal year = [Y] ktCO2e
    • percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleets from fiscal year 2005 to 2006 to current reporting fiscal year = [Y/X] %

Target:

  • GHG emissions from on-road vehicle fleet reduced by 40% by 2025 (0.684 ktCO2e) and 90% by 2050 (1.545 ktCO2e)Footnote 2Footnote 4

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

As conventional vehicles are replaced by ZEVs and hybrids over time and Ecodriving training is implemented, Transport Canada will reduce GHG emissions from its administrative and executive fleets

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13 – Climate Action

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Divert at least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by 2030

FSDS Contributing Action: Other (other actions that support the Greening Government Goal and Target but not a FSDS Contributing Action)
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Develop and conduct surveys to understand current waste streams generated at large Transport Canada facilities (10,000m2 or more)

Track and disclose waste diversion rates by 2022

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

The updated Greening Government Strategy (announced in November 2020) delayed the start of waste reporting. Data for this target will not be available until the next release of Transport Canada’s DSDS in 2023.

 

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Divert at least 75% (by weight) of plastic waste from landfills by 2030

FSDS Contributing Action: Other (other actions that support the Greening Government Goal and Target but not a FSDS Contributing Action)
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Promote the use of alternatives to single use plastics in Transport Canada procurement decisions

Promote the reuse or recycling of plastics in Transport Canada waste management decisions

Develop and conduct surveys to understand use of plastic products in Transport Canada operations

Track and disclose plastic waste diversion rates by 2022

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

The updated Greening Government Strategy (announced in November 2020) delayed the start of waste reporting. Data for this target will not be available until the next release of Transport Canada’s DSDS in 2023.

 

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Divert at least 90% (by weight) of all construction and demolition waste from landfills (striving to achieve 100% by 2030)

FSDS Contributing Action: Other
(other actions that support the Greening Government Goal and Target but not a FSDS Contributing Action)
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target and the UNSDGs Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Track and disclose construction and demolition waste diversion rates by 2022

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

The updated Greening Government Strategy (announced in November 2020) delayed the start of waste reporting. Data for this target will not be available until the next release of Transport Canada’s DSDS in 2023.

 

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Our administrative fleet will be comprised of at least 80% zero-emission vehicles by 2030

FSDS Contributing Action: Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

100% of new light-duty unmodified administrative fleet vehicle purchases will be zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) where operations permit

All new Transport Canada executive fleet vehicle purchases will be ZEVs or hybrids

Install charging stations in facilities where Transport Canada employees are working and there is a need for charging infrastructureFootnote 5

Starting points 1 and 2:

As of 2019 to 2020, Transport Canada’s on-road administrative fleet is composed of 7.4%Footnote 6 of ZEVs

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage (%) of ZEVs in Transport Canada’s administrative fleet as calculated by:
    • number of Transport Canada’s administrative vehicles in the current year = [X]
    • number of ZEVs in administrative fleet in the current year = [Y]
    • percentage (%) ZEVs in Transport Canada’s administrative fleet = [Y/X]%

Target 1:

  • By 2030, 80% of Transport Canada’s new light-duty unmodified administrative fleet will be ZEVs

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percentage (%) of administrative vehicles purchased that are ZEVs as calculated by:
    • number of administrative vehicles purchased in the year = [X]
    • number of ZEVs purchased in the year = [Y]
    • percentage (%) new administrative vehicles purchased that are ZEVs = [Y/X]%

Target 2:

  • 100% of Transport Canada’s new purchases of light-duty unmodified administrative fleet will be ZEVs where operations permit

Starting point 3:

17% of Transport Canada facilities equipped with at least 1 charging station as of 2019 to 2020

Performance indicator 3:

  • Percentage of facilities that are equipped with at least 1 charging station

Target 3:

  • By 2023, all Transport Canada facilities will be equipped with at least 1 charging station

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

By replacing conventional on-road vehicles by ZEVs, Transport Canada will reduce its GHG emissions. The replacement of vehicles will be informed by telematics, which will assess vehicle usage and best suited replacement

The purchase and installation of charging stations will enable deployment of ZEVs across Transport Canada facilities

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SGD 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 9 – Industry Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 13 – Climate Action

Internal ServicesFootnote 7

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: By 2022, and following each subsequent climate risk assessment process, take action to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operationsFootnote 3

FSDS Contributing Action: Increase training and support on assessing climate change impacts, undertaking climate change risk assessments and developing adaptation actions to public service employees, and facilitate sharing of best practices and lessons learned
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2021, and at regular intervals thereafter, take action to improve understanding of the risks posed by the impacts of climate change to federal assets, services and operations across the country.Footnote 3

Building on the completion of a departmental climate risk assessment in 2019 to 2020, Transport Canada will also undertake the following series of actions which are organized by three results chains:

  1. Assessing and addressing climate change risks
    1. Establish measures to reduce climate risks to Transport Canada and increase departmental resilience, through the development of the second departmental climate change adaptation plan
    2. Implement the Transportation Assets Risk Assessment initiative to:
      • Support risk assessments of federally-owned and/or managed transportation infrastructure
      • Support research and analysis on risk assessments and climate change adaptation solutions that are of benefit to federal infrastructure 
      • Share information and analysis with the broader transportation sector to aid in spurring action and increasing the understanding of risks and potential solutions that can be employed
  2. Building knowledge and capacity
    1. Facilitate departmental adaptive capacity building activities that help strengthen Transport Canada’s climate change adaptation knowledge and capacity
  3. Mainstreaming climate change considerations
    1. Account for current and future potential climate risks within departmental business continuity and risk planning in order to adjust Transport Canada’s risk response and processes, thus strengthening departmental resilience
    2. Inform Transport Canada’s investment planning process through the incorporation of climate change impacts and adaptation within capital and operating approval documents
    3. Integrate climate change impacts and adaptation into departmental program design and delivery criteria
  1. Assessing and addressing climate change risks:
    • 1 a) Starting point:

      Transport Canada’s first climate change adaptation plan sunset in March 2016. In early 2020, Transport Canada completed a climate risk assessment, by identifying and evaluating climate risks and opportunities in areas such as Transport Canada’s: assets and operations, regulatory role, policies and programs. This work helped inform the development of the department’s second climate change adaptation plan (between 2020 to 2021 and 2024 to 2025), which was approved in Spring 2021.

      • Performance indicator 1:
        • Finalize the development of Transport Canada’s second climate change adaptation plan
      • Target 1:
        • Transport Canada senior management approval of the second departmental climate change adaptation plan by March 31, 2021
      • Performance indicator 2:
        • Status of the climate change adaptation plan’s implementation presented to senior management annually
      • Target 2:
        • First year progress report to senior management no later than June 30, 2022
    • 1 b) Starting point:

      Budget 2017 announced investments of up to $16.35 million for the Transportation Asset Risk Assessment (TARA) initiative over five years, beginning in 2017 to 2018, to better understand climate risks to federal transportation assets

      The TARA initiative also undertakes dissemination of lessons learned from the support of climate risk assessment projects

      Climate risk assessments of transportation assets are intended to lead to the incorporation of climate considerations into asset management plans and other decision documents

      As of January 2022, 50 projects have been approved for funding under the TARA initiative. These projects have supported full or partial climate risk assessments of 64 federal transportation assets across Canada. The current TARA initiative is set to sunset on March 31st, 2022.

      • Performance indicator 1:
        • Percentage of asset management plans and other decision documents that integrate climate considerations (as a result of Transportation Assets Risk Assessment initiative climate risk assessment projects supported with operating funding)
      • Target 1:
        • By the end of the 2021 to 2022 fiscal year, establish a baseline percentage of the documents integrating climate considerations in order to establish a targetFootnote 8
      • Performance indicator 2:
        • Number of dissemination activities (for example, conferences, presentations, webinars) undertaken to share lessons learned and best practices in assessing climate risk gained from the delivery of the Transportation Assets Risk Assessment initiative
      • Target 2:
        • At least ten dissemination activities undertaken per year over two years, until March 31, 2022
  2. Building knowledge and capacity:
    • 2 a) Starting point:

      Between 2015 and 2019, Transport Canada has hosted 13 transportation adaptation webinars, which have attracted over 1000 participants from all levels of government (including Transport Canada), industry, academia and non-governmental organizations. Many of Transport Canada’s climate change knowledge and capacity activities, such as the webinar series, extend to external transportation stakeholders, thus fostering both internal and external capacity

      In early 2020, Transport Canada conducted an assessment of its departmental adaptive capacity with the use of the Climate Capacity Diagnosis Development tool. This is the first time this tool has been used by a federal department to assess their current and desired level of adaptive capacity

      The assessment identified actions for the Department to pursue to increase its adaptive capacity, by transitioning to a higher response level

      The assessment showed that Transport Canada’s current adaptive capacity is between Climate Capacity Diagnosis and Development Response Levels 2: Stakeholder Responsive and 3: Efficient Management and the department should strive towards Response Level 5: Strategic Resilience over the long-term

      • Performance indicator 1:
        • Number of Transport Canada employees who attended transportation adaptation webinars
      • Target 1:
        • Increase in the number of Transport Canada attendees, per year
      • Performance indicator 2:
        • Percentage of Transport Canada employees whose knowledge increased as a result of the information they acquired by attending a transportation adaptation webinar
      • Target 2:
        • 75% of webinar survey respondents, per webinar, indicated a moderate or significant increase in their adaptation knowledge
      • Performance Indicator 3:
        • Complete transition from Climate Capacity Diagnosis and Development Response Level 2: Stakeholder Responsive to Response Level 3: Efficient Management
      • Target 3:
        • By March 31, 2026 complete the implementation of all activities that will allow for the transition to Response Level 3. This timeframe aligns with the end date of Transport Canada’s current Adaptation Plan.
  3. Mainstreaming climate change considerations:
    • 3 a) Starting point:

      Since 2012, climate risk and transportation adaptation input has been incorporated into Transport Canada’s corporate risk profile, Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports. Transport Canada has recently moved to an which includes consideration of public, corporate and climate risks. Additionally, Transport Canada’s Business Continuity Plan accounts for natural disasters and extreme weather

      • Performance indicator 1:
        • Climate change considerations continue to inform Transport Canada’s integrated risk planning process
      • Target 1:
        • Climate change considerations continue to inform Transport Canada’s integrated risk planning process, on an annual basis
      • Performance indicator 2:
        • Percentage of recommended adjustments made to Transport Canada’s Business Continuity Plan from a tabletop exercise focused on extreme weather events
      • Target 2:
        • 100% of recommended strategic planning or operational adjustments are incorporated within the Business Continuity Plan, or approval of existing measures, that will strengthen Transport Canada’s response to an extreme weather event, by March 31, 2023
    • 3 b) Starting point:

      Capital projects at Transport Canada assets (airports and ports) are prioritized on an annual basis according to available funding (urgent health and safety projects are considered to be the highest priorities)

      The Business Case and Project Charter provide key parameters for projects submitted for approval and must ascertain the need and justify the course of action chosen for the project. Currently, these documents do not include explicit climate change requirements

      • Performance indicator 1:
        • Extent to which Transport Canada’s five-year investment plan references climate change adaptation
      • Target 1:
        • 100% of recommended climate change adaptation input into the investment plan included by March 31, 2021
      • Performance indicator 2:
        • Requirements to consider climate change risks and options for adaptation, including risk acceptance, be developed within Transport Canada’s Business Case/ Project Charter documents
      • Target 2:
        • Application of the revised Business Case/Project Charter template by March 31, 2023
    • 3 c) Starting point:

      At Transport Canada, the integration of sustainable development into policies, plans and programs is supported by the use of a Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool, which, since 2013, has been the basis of the department’s Strategic Environmental Assessment Process. This tool requires all potential policies, plans or programs to consider possible effects on the economy, on society and on the environment. It also includes specific questions to assess possible impacts on Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals and targets

      Additionally, Transport Canada has applied a climate change resilience lens to project proposals submitted under its National Trade Corridors Fund which examines how projects will address and account for vulnerabilities to climate risk

      • Performance indicator 1:
        • Updated climate change adaptation component of Transport Canada’s Sustainable Transportation Assessment Tool (STAT)
      • Target 1:
        • STAT adaptation component updated by March 31, 2023Footnote 9
      • Performance indicator 2:
        • Established list of existing Transport Canada programs to review to identify opportunities to incorporate change climate risks and adaptation in their design and/or delivery
      • Target 2:
        • By March 31, 2022, establish a list of existing programs for review
      • Performance indicator 3:
        • Percentage of existing programs reviewed
      • Target 3:
        • 100% of existing programs reviewed by March 31, 2023

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Impacts associated with climate change and extreme weather are disrupting the movement of both freight and people, and increasing costs within the transportation sector. These impacts are projected to intensify in the future

Transport Canada owns and operates federal transportation assets, which are important components of our national transportation system

  1. Assessing and addressing climate change risks

    Assessing climate change risks and opportunities to the department supports more informed decision making, and taking adaptation action strengthens Transport Canada’s resilience. Moving from climate risk assessment to addressing impacts also enables operators of federally-owned and/or managed transportation assets to enhance the stewardship of these public assets 
  2. Building knowledge and capacity

    Increasing Transport Canada employees’ knowledge may result in more informed and evidence-based departmental decisions that incorporate current and future climate risks. Many of Transport Canada’s capacity building actions also result in enhancing climate resiliency for the broader transportation sector
  3. Mainstreaming climate change considerations

    Finally, mainstreaming climate change considerations is a key part of Transport Canada’s risk management efforts. Through the integration of adaptation into federal policy, planning, and operations, adaptation planning and decision-making will become part of the ongoing management processes

Ultimately, Transport Canada will be able to enhance the protection of public assets and resources and strengthen planning and decision-making

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 9.1 - Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all

SDG Target 13.1 - Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

SDG Target 13.2- Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

SDG Target 13.3 - Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Climate Change and Clean Air

FSDS Contributing Action: By 2021, adopt climate-resilient building codes being developed by National Research Council CanadaFootnote 3
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

All major real property projects will integrate climate change adaptation into the design, construction and operation aspects

In order to achieve the above objective, over the course of this Departmental Suitable Development Strategy period, Transport Canada will undertake the following progressive actions:

Establish mechanisms that facilitate the consideration of climate risks within the design, construction and operations / maintenance aspects of Transport Canada’s assets and real property projects

Starting Point:

Project experiences to-date under the Transportation Assets Risk Assessment initiative (since 2017) have highlighted key challenges for asset owners and operators in translating information gained through a climate risk assessment into adaptation action. Additionally, while the Transportation Assets Risk Assessment initiative has funded risk assessments of 23 Transport Canada transportation assets to date, the department would benefit from a more strategic and rigorous approach to risk assessment across its broader asset portfolio

Performance indicator 1:

  • Development of a tool that allows Transport Canada to prioritize the most vulnerable assets within its portfolio for a more comprehensive assessment of climate risks

Target 1:

  • Review integration of tool in departmental decision processes beginning in 2022 to 2023

Performance indicator 2:

  • Creation of guidance on how to consider climate risks in the design, construction and operations / maintenance aspects of Transport Canada’s assets and real property projects

Target 2:

  • Guidance document developed by March 31, 2023

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

This action will support the development of measures to reduce climate change risk to Transport Canada’s assets, services and operations by ensuring that climate risks are considered in their design and operations. This will position Transport Canada assets to be more resilient in the face of a changing climate

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 9.1 - Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all 

SDG Target 13.1 - Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Climate Change and Clean AirFootnote 7

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Use 100% clean electricity by 2025

FFSDS Contributing Action: Other
(Other actions that support the Greening Government Goal and Target but not a FSDS Contributing Action)
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Use 100% of clean electricity at Transport Canada’s facilities by 2025 and, when not feasible, purchase renewable electricity certificates equivalent to that produced by the high-carbon portion of the electricity grid in provinces where the department owns facilities

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

The target is not controlled by Transport Canada, therefore we cannot influence progress. Transport Canada is dependent on the energy providers for clean electricity and Public Services and Procurement Canada for renewable energy certificates.Footnote 10

 

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Greening Government
(Other actions that support the Goal and a FSDS Contributing Action but do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Minimize embodied carbon and the use of harmful materials in construction and renovation
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target and the UNSDGs Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Specify low embodied carbon structural materials in new constructions, major renovations and construction contracts

Starting point:

As of 2019 to 2020, Transport Canada does not specify that low embodied carbon materials must be used in its construction projects

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of new construction and major renovation projects in which embodied carbon in building materials was minimizedFootnote 11

Target:

  • By 2025, all Transport Canada construction contracts will include specifications for low embodied carbon materials in construction

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Using low embodied carbon materials helps to reduce embodied GHG emissions in Transport Canada’s assets (scope 3 emissions) and encourages industry to adopt low carbon extraction, production and disposal practices

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 9 – Industry Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 13 – Climate Action

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

FSDS Contributing Action: Departments will use environmental criteria to reduce the environmental impact and ensure best value in government procurement decisions
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Include criteria that address broader environmental benefits when procuring or disposing of goods and services that have a high environmental impact, by following these best practices:

  1. Implementing a new procurement vehicle for printing services with Shared Services Canada (DISO)Footnote 12 will enable procurement of environmentally friendly managed printing services
  2. Providing functioning equipment that has reached end-of-life to select organizations
  3. Deploying an optimized printer service throughout the department
  4. Migrating applications from low efficiency legacy data centres to the Cloud

Seek opportunities to adopt new practices, including a current proposal to ensure that IT-based capital projects are assessed for positive environmental impact.

Starting Point 1:

The new standing offer for management of printing services procurement vehicle is not implemented

Performance indicator 1:

  • Implementation of the new procurement vehicle for electronic devices is completed

Target 1:

  • New procurement vehicle implemented nationally by March 31, 2025Footnote 13

Starting Point 2:

100% of end-of-life electronic hardware is disposed of in a safe and environmentally-sound manner:

85% is sent to Computers for Schools +

10% is sent to the Ontario Electronic Stewardship +

5% is sent to TC’s Cyber Security group for secure destruction

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percentage of end-of-life hardware disposed of in an environmentally-sound manner

Target 2:

  • Maintain the 100% environmentally-sound disposal rate

Starting Point 3:

Number of Multi-Function Devices (MFDs):
Tower C: 132
Other Sites:  388 printers/MFDs

User/Device ratio:
Tower C: 20:1
Regional sites: 9:1

Printing Volume:
Tower C:  10 million sheets
Regional sites: 12.6 million sheets

Performance indicator 3:

  1. Reduced number of MFDs
  2. Increased User/Device ratio
  3. Reduced print volume

Target 3:

During 2022 to 2023Footnote 13

  • 1a) reduce Tower C MFDs by 30%
  • 1b) increase the User/Device ratio by 50% to 30:1
  • 1c) with a return to worksite of 30% Tower C occupancy: reduce print volume by 70-80%

By March 31, 2025Footnote 13

  • 2a) 40% reduction in MFDs
  • 2b) reaching a User/Device ratio of 15:1

Starting Point 4:

Less than 1% of applications in the Cloud

Performance indicator 4:

  • Percentage of applications migrated to the Cloud

Target 4:

Migration of applications to the Cloud or SSC Enterprise Data Centre (total % by end of year)

  • 2020 to 2021 – 1%
  • 2021 to 2022 – 5%
  • 2022 to 2023 – 21.5%
  • 2023 to 2024 – 44.6%
  • 2024 to 2025 – 70.7%
  • 2025 to 2026 – 100%Footnote 14

Starting Point 5:

IT-enabled capital projects are currently not assessed for environmental impact

Performance indicator 5:

  • Percentage of IT projects assessed for environmental impact

Target 5:

  • By March 31, 2021, the process and measurement tools will be in place to ensure that all capital projects reviewed by Transport Canada’s Architecture Review Board will be assessed for environmental impact

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

  1. The new managed printing services procurement vehicle includes several equipment environmental specifications:
    1. Energy Star registration
    2. Consumables management, packaging, recycling and applicable environmental certifications (EcoLogo, Green Seal, BlueAngel, Ecolabel, etc.)
  2. By sending functioning electronic equipment that is no longer of use to the federal government to schools, libraries and other non–profit organizations, we extend the life of this equipment
  3. Managed print services reduce the number of printers per employee and encourages a transition toward paperless workflow, reducing paper consumption
  4. Cloud computing is estimated to be 98% more carbon efficient than legacy data centres
  5. By incorporating sustainable development considerations to the investment decision-making process, we ensure that environmental impacts are considered alongside financial and business implications

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

Internal Services

FSDS Contributing Action: Support for green procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Train procurement specialists and acquisition cardholders on green procurement using the Canada School of Public Services Green Procurement course

Develop guidance material to support green procurement at Transport Canada

Starting Point 1:

As of 2019 to 2020, 100% of Transport Canada procurement specialists and cardholders have completed training on green procurement

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage of new procurement specialists and cardholders who have completed training on green procurement

Target 1:

  • 100% of procurement specialists and cardholders have taken the course

Starting Point 2:

No guidance available as of 2019 to 2020

Performance indicator 2:

  • Guidance material supporting green procurement is developed

Target 2:

  • Guidance developed by March 31, 2022

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Training procurement specialists and acquisition cardholders on green procurement allows for better informed decisions for including green criteria in contracts for both commodities and services

Supporting documentation on green procurement will enable employees to make informed decisions and incorporate environmental considerations in their purchasing decisions of goods and services

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13 – Climate Action

Internal Services

Greening Government goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Greening Government.
(Other actions that support the Greening Government Goal but do not directly support a FSDS Contributing Action and do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Other
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Encourage employees to adopt sustainable workplace practices and engage in greener initiatives through green reps, education and awarenessFootnote 15

Starting Point:

No green reps in place

Performance indicator:

  • Existence of green reps at Transport Canada and conduct of activities and events within Transport Canada promoting sustainable workplace practices

Target:

  • By March 31, 2021, green reps are in place and calendar of activities and events has been developed

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

By having green reps that focuses on the adoption of sustainable workplace practices throughout the department, Transport Canada will adopt more sustainable workplace practices

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13 – Climate Action

All sectors of Transport Canada

Implement a digital-first culture at Transport Canada where applications facilitating telework are enhanced, mobile phones replace desktop phones, and electronic signatures are enabled

Starting Point:

Transport Canada has already deployed a number of technologies enabling employees to work remotely nationally. We will start reporting on this metric by Quarter 4 of fiscal year 2020 to 2021 and as part of our Transformation Plan, the department continues to look for opportunities to enhance the Remote working experience for employees

More than 90% of Transport Canada employees are equipped with digital tools to work remotely, however, the nature of the work means that not all employees can work remotely

Performance indicator:

  • Elements of the digital-first culture are adopted

Target:

  • 1a) by March 31, 2021, Transport Canada will have replaced all landlines with mobile phones where feasible
  • 1b) by March 31, 2021, Transport Canada will have deployed technology and implemented processes enabling electronic signatures

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

By implementing a digital-first culture, Transport Canada will reduce its paper consumption and electronic waste generation, all while adopting more efficient ways to deliver its mandate

Giving employees an option to work from home will reduce the GHGs associated with commuting to work

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

Internal Services

Transition to digital service delivery (e.g. digitizing Transport Canada Centre in-person services, mobile fingerprinting, and remote inspections)

Starting Point:

Transport Canada is undertaking transformative action to build the tools and processes that enable digital services delivery

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percent services transitioned to digital delivery

Target 1:

  1. By March 31, 2021, Transport Canada will confirm number of in-person services slated for digitization

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percent new services delivered digitally

Target 2:

  • By March 31, 2023, 100% of new services delivered by Transport Canada will be digital

Contribution to FSDS goal/target: 

Transport Canada is transitioning to a focus on digital service delivery to Canadians.

This will reduce/eliminate in-person services and provide the public with the flexibility to access Transport Canada services from any Internet-connected device. This is also expected to reduce paper consumption and electronic waste generation while enabling Transport Canada to more efficiently deliver its mandate

Giving the public an option to access services remotely will reduce the GHGs associated with commuting to Transport Canada sites

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

Internal Services

Achieving greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and air pollution reductions through innovative vessel design in the replacement of 2 of the 4 Transport Canada Owned Ferries in Atlantic and Eastern QuebecFootnote 16

Starting Point:

35.450 ktCO2e, GHG emissions from Transport Canada’s ferries in 2005 to 2006 (updated from 56 ktCO2e from 2020 to 2023 DSDS)

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleets as calculated by:
    • GHG emissions from fleets in fiscal year 2005 to 2006 (base year): = 56.054 ktCO2e
    • GHG emissions from fleets in current reporting fiscal year = [Y] ktCO2e
    • percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleets from fiscal year 2005 to 2006 to current reporting fiscal year = [Y/X]%

Target:

  • GHG emissions from ferries reduced by 40% by 2025 (14.18 ktCO2e) and 90% by 2050 (31.905 ktCO2e)Footnote 17Footnote 18

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada will undertake innovative vessel design that will reduce energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its 2 new ferries

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13 – Climate Action

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Climate Change goal icon

Effective Action on Climate Change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius and supports efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; supported by a whole-of-government approach to implementation

Climate Change goal icon

FSDS Target: By 2030, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address, under the Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) development of new international standards and recommended practices and through the development and implementation of new domestic standards

Canada will be implementing the CO2 Emissions Standard for airplanes, which targets domestic and international emissions, and the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA), which targets international emissions only

Starting point:

Transport Canada actively leads the Government of Canada’s participation at ICAO on the development of environmental standards and on topics related to reducing the impact of aviation on the environment, including contributing to the creation of a Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation, agreed to at ICAO in fall 2016 and its subsequent implementation

Domestic regulatory instruments to reduce GHG emissions (CO2 Emissions Standard for airplanes and CORSIA) are drafted and targeted for publication, and will align with the ICAO international standards

Performance indicator 1:

  • The CO2 Emissions Standard for airplanes has been implemented domestically

Performance indicator 2:

  • CORSIA has been  implemented domestically

Targets 1 and 2:

  • Both the CO2 Emissions Standard for airplanes and CORSIA have been implemented domestically by March 2021

Performance indicator 3:

  • Percent of regulatees (manufacturers) who comply with the CO2 Emissions Standard for airplanes

Target 3:

  • Once in force, 100% compliance by airplane manufacturers to the CO2 Emissions Standard

Performance indicator 4:

  • Percent of regulatees (airline operators) who comply with CORSIA

Target 4:

  • Once in force, 100% compliance to CORSIA by Canadian airline operators

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Working with ICAO on the development of measures targeting the reduction of GHGs will contribute to international consistency and lower emissions

Canada’s implementation of ICAO’s CO2 Emissions Standard for airplanes will incentivize the adoption of more fuel efficient technologies by manufacturers.  All new airplane designs will have to meet the Standard as of 2020, and all in-production airplanes will have to meet the standard as of 2028

The direct impact of the Standard on GHG emissions will be realized in the future as the fleet is renewed through the purchase of new airplanes

Implementation of the Standard in Canada is an important step in the emissions reduction process. The standard is applicable to the aeronautical products of 3 airplane manufacturers in Canada

Under CORSIA, all implicated Canadian airline operators will contribute to carbon-neutral growth of the international aviation sector from 2021 onwards for their international operations. The obligations include a requirement for all operators, foreign and domestic, to offset emissions from a portion of their covered international flights through the purchase of credits

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

FSDS Contributing Action: Work with partners on climate change
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address GHG emissions from aviation through Canada’s Action Plan. This voluntary plan identifies key on-going and planned initiatives to reduce GHGs and includes a fuel efficiency target. The Action Plan is expected to be renewed by 2021.

Starting Point:

The Action Plan was signed in 2012 and expires in 2020, and includes annual reporting of progress against a fuel efficiency target

The latest annual report (2019) under the Action Plan shows that Canadian air carriers improved their annual average fuel efficiency by 1.77% between 2008 and 2019

Performance indicator 1:

  • Annual average fuel efficiency improvements between 2008 and 2020

Target 1:

  • The Action Plan set a target to improve annual average fuel efficiency by 1.5% between 2008 to 2020

Performance indicator 2:

Target 2:

  • Extension of the Action Plan for 2021-22 and new action plan in place by the end of 2022Footnote 20

Contribution to FSDS goal/target: 

Through actions taken under the Action Plan, such as improving operations, renewing existing fleets, and conducting RD&D to support the future use of sustainable aviation fuel, industry and the government work to address GHG emissions from the sector

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 7.2 - By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

SDG Target 8.4 - Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, with developed countries taking the lead

SDG Target 9.4 - By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental action to the
FSDS goal and target and the UNSDGs
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address, under the Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative, greenhouse gas (GHG) and other air emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations

*this departmental action also contributes to the reduction of air pollutant emissions, which supports the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy’s (FSDS) ‘Safe and Healthy Communities’ goal

Starting Point:

During 2019 to 2020:

Progress was made on negotiations related to the Initial IMO GHG Strategy. A resolution inviting Member States to encourage voluntary cooperation between the port and shipping sectors to contribute to reducing GHG emissions from ships was also adopted

85% of instruments were aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Vessels were 94% in compliance with vessel emissions regulations (based on minor deficiencies observed)

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage of instruments that are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Target 1:

  • 100% of instruments are aligned with domestic legislation or international standards

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percentage of regulatees who comply with the regulations

Target 2:

  • 100% compliance with regulations

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Working with IMO on the development of measures targeting the reduction of GHGs will contribute to international consistency and lower emissions

Contribution to UNSDGs: 

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

SDG Target 7.2 - By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

SDG Target 7.3 - By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

SDG Target 7.a - By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology

SDG Target 9.5 - Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending 

SDG Target 17.16 - Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries

Climate Change and Clean Air

FFSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Support, under the Support for Vehicle GHG Emissions Regulations, Environment and Climate Change Canada’s development and implementation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations for light-duty vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

Transport Canada continues to support Canada’s climate change targets through the development of a strategy to decarbonize emissions-intensive on-road freightFootnote 21, in collaboration with other federal departments and stakeholders. This strategy is expected to be completed in 2022-23.

Starting Point:

From 2005 to 2018 (latest year for which data is available):

  • GHG emission intensity decreased by 11% for passenger transportation, not including off-road equipment
  • GHG emission intensity decreased by 8% for on-road freight transportation

Performance indicator:

  • Change in transportation emissions intensity as measured in grams per unit of activity (e.g.: tonnes-km, passenger-km)
  • A Strategy to decarbonize on-road freights is developed

Target:

  • Continuous improvement in emissions intensity by March 31, 2023
  • In 2022-2023, develop a strategy to decarbonize on-road freight

Note: it will only be possible to set an absolute value if the transportation sector’s share of the Government of Canada’s reduction targets are established and published

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:

The transportation sector represents about a quarter of Canada’s GHG emissions, with light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle emissions accounting for 50% and 35% of the total, respectively. The light-duty and heavy-duty vehicle GHG regulations establish stringent GHG emission standards on new vehicles which will help reduce emissions in the transportation sector

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

FFSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Conduct research to generate technical evidence required to support legislative and regulatory approaches to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions, and to promote the adoption of clean technologies across several modes of transportation, including:

  • eTV: Supporting projects under the ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles Program to address GHG emissions from the road sector through its testing of advanced technologies and innovative practices to inform the development of regulations, as well as industry codes and standards to ensure that new technologies are introduced in Canada in a safe, secure and timely manner

*these departmental actions also contribute to the reduction of air pollutants, which supports the FSDS “Effective Action on Climate Change” and “Safe and Healthy Communities” goals

Starting Point:

In 2019 to 2020, Transport Canada’s Innovation Centre supported over 100 projects across all modes to advance research, development and testing of clean technology solutions for Canada’s transportation system

Multiple road research projects were conducted in 2019 to 2020, including: testing the aerodynamic benefits and dynamic performance of cooperative truck platooning systems; occupant protection performance testing in electric and conventional vehicles, the studying the safety and environmental benefits of low rolling resistance tires, on-board sensor testing for measuring heavy duty vehicle NOx emissions and evaluating the long term performance of electric vehicle batteries

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of the total research budget for testing and evaluation projects committed or spent

Target:

  • 90% of total research budget committed or spent

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada’s Innovation Centre conducts research to generate technical evidence required to support legislative and regulatory approaches to reducing GHG emissions, and to promote the adoption of clean technologies across several modes of transportation

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

SDG Target 7.3 - By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

SDG Target 9.4 - By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

Climate Change and Clean Air

FFSDS Contributing Action: Work with partners on climate change
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions under the Heavy-Duty Vehicle Retrofit Requirements Program by working with other federal departments, provinces, territories and industry to explore the challenges and barriers to adopting fuel-saving retrofits on heavy-duty trucks, informing the development of future strategies to reduce GHGs from this sector

*this departmental action also contributes to the reduction of air pollutant emissions, which supports the FSDS ‘Safe and Healthy Communities’ goal

Starting Point:

A commitment was made in the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change to develop requirements to retrofit in-use heavy-duty vehicles with fuel saving devices

A federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) working group was created explore opportunities to support the adoption of fuel saving devices in the sector

The first phase of work will explore the opportunities and challenges around adoption of fuel saving technology.  It is expected to be completed in 2020 and will inform future work by the Task Force.Footnote 22 The second phase of the work will explore program and policy options that further encourage the adoption of retrofit technologies in the HDV sector.Footnote 23

Performance indicator:

  • FPTs collaborate to document the challenges, opportunities and policy options around adoption of after-market fuel saving technologyFootnote 24

Target:

  • Phase 1 Report will be complete in fall 2020
  • Phase 2 Report will be complete in Spring 2022

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada with support from provincial and territorial governments are working collaboratively to explore the HDV landscape across the country to explore opportunities for increasing adoption of HDV fuel-saving retrofits that support businesses within the trucking sector

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

FFSDS Contributing Action: Work with partners on climate change
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the rail sector by enhancing collaboration with the Railway Association of Canada (RAC)

Starting Point:

A Memorandum of Understanding with the rail industry is in place to cover 2018 to 2022

Performance indicator:

  • Annual average fuel efficiency improvements between 2018 and 2022

Target:

  • By 2022, reduce emissions intensity for Class 1 freight by 6%, intercity passenger by 6% and regional and short line railways by 3% - from a 2017 baseline

Performance indicator:

  • Renewal of the Memorandum of Understanding with the rail industry to cover 2023 to 2027 period

Target:

  • Collaborate with rail industry to finalize a renewed Memorandum of Understanding by the end of 2022

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada and RAC haveFootnote 25 a Memorandum of Understanding to address GHG emissions in the sector

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 7.a - By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology

SDG Target 9.4 - By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

SDG Target 17.17 - Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships

Climate Change and Clean Air

Climate Change goal icon

Zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) will represent 10% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2035Footnote 26

FSDS Contributing Action: Work with partners on climate change
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Collaborate with provincial and territorial governments through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Zero-Emission Vehicle Working Group (FPT ZEV Working Group) to advance the uptake of zero-emission vehicles in Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and Natural Resources Canada are also members of this working group

Starting Point:

The FPT ZEV Working Group was established Under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, As of September 2019, the group’s objectives are to exchange information related to the development and implementation of ZEV measures which increase their uptake, with a view towards ensuring alignment and complementarity of policies and programs across the jurisdictions, where appropriate

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of new light-duty vehicle sales that are ZEVs

Target:

The Government does not have specific ZEV sales targets for the in-between years, however, notional benchmarks have been developed to ensure Canada is on a path towards meeting its 2025 target. For 2020-23 the annual benchmarks are as follows:

  • 3.9% of new LDV sales to be ZEVs by December 31, 2020;
  • 4.5% of new LDV sales to be ZEVs by December 31, 2021; and
  • 5.4% of new LDV sales to be ZEVs by December 31, 2022

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Through the FPT ZEV Working Group, the jurisdictions hold quarterly meetings where members share their best practices and experience to increase the uptake of ZEVs

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 11.2 - By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons

SDG Target 11.6 - By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

FSDS Contributing Action: Support businesses and Canadians in taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Support increased adoption of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by Canadians and Canadian businesses through Transport Canada’s Incentive for Zero-Emission Vehicles program (iZEV)

Starting Point:

In January 2019, the government announced ZEV sales targets as follows: 10% of new light-duty vehicle (LDV) sales are to be ZEVs by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2040. On June 29, 2021, the Government announced an acceleration of these targets to reach 100% by 2035.

To help advance towards these targets, Budget 2019 allocated $300 million over three yearsFootnote 27, starting 2019 to 2020, for the iZEV program

For iZEV: 63.5% of the incentive rebate fund used as of March 31, 2020

As presented in the 2020 Fall Economic Statement, an additional $287 million in fundingFootnote 28 has been allocated to the iZEV program to fulfill the Budget 2019 commitment for a three-year program that runs until March 31, 2022Footnote 29

In the 2022 Fall Economic and Fiscal Update, the Government of Canada announced an additional $73 million in funding in order to continue delivering the iZEV Program until March 31, 2022Footnote 30

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage of new LDV sales that are ZEVs

Target 1:

The Government does not have specific ZEV sales targets for the in-between years, however, notional benchmarks have been developed to ensure Canada is on a path towards meeting its 2025 target. For 2020 to 2023 the annual benchmarks are as follows:

  • 3.9% of new LDV sales to be ZEVs by December 31, 2020
  • 4.5% of new LDV sales to be ZEVs by December 31, 2021; and
  • 5.4% of new LDV sales to be ZEVs by December 31, 2022

Performance Indicator 2:

  • Percentage of iZEV Program’s available incentive funds provided to Canadians (i.e., used)

Target 2:

  • 100% of incentive funding provided to Canadians by March 31, 2022

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Under the iZEV program, Transport Canada provides a point of sale incentive of up to $5,000 on eligible ZEVs (including plug-in hybrids). This program is making ZEVs more affordable, thus encouraging more Canadians to purchase these vehicles and in turn, helping to increase the proportion of new light-duty vehicle sales that are ZEVs

By improving the market share of ZEVs, this program is also helping to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector and thus contributing to the FSDS target of reducing economy-wide 2030 GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emissions levels 

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 11.6 - By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

Climate Change goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Effective Action on Climate Change. (Other actions that support the Goal and a FSDS Contributing Action but do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Provide support and funding for climate resilience
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Through the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, Transport Canada supports the research, development and testing of innovative adaptation technologies, and capacity-building efforts (for example, through adaptation outreach and engagement activities), with the goal of increasing capacity to adapt existing and future northern transportation infrastructure and operations to climate change

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

The NTAI program sunset in March 2021, therefore no indicators or targets are established at this time. Progress reporting from previous years can be found here: Transport Canada's 2020-2021 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report

 

Climate Change and Clean Air

FSDS Contributing Action: Provide support and funding for climate resilience
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Continue on-going implementation of the National Trade Corridors Fund (NTCF), which is investing $4.2B between 2017 to 2018 and 2027 to 2028, to strengthen the resiliency and efficiency of the transportation systemFootnote 31

Budget 2021 recapitalized the NTCF to encourage investments to improve Canada’s road, rail, air and marine shipping routes, build long-term resilience for the Canadian economy, and support international and internal trade. Of this total funding, 15% is dedicated for future Arctic and Northern calls for proposals to build and improve transportation networks in these regions.

Starting Point:

In 2021, the Minister of Transport announced the allocation of $246M to five projects, leveraging total investments of $330.7M, under the Arctic and Northern call for proposals, which launched in October 2020 and closed in March 2021, with committed funding from the $400M provided in Budget 2019 for Arctic and Northern projects. Additional project announcements are anticipated in the near term.

To date under the NTCF, Transport Canada has launched six calls for proposals, four of which have concluded. The NTCF is currently accepting proposals under the following calls for proposals:

  • The Increasing the Fluidity of Canada’s Supply Chains call for proposals targeting projects that strengthen Canada’s connections to global markets and support the resiliency of regional and inter-provincial trade corridor, which was launched in December 2021 and remains open until March 31, 2022. Funding decisions by the Minister of Transport are expected in Fall 2022, followed by the signing of contribution agreements and project starts beginning later in the year.Footnote 32
  • The Relieving Supply Chain Congestion at Canadian Ports call for proposals aimed at projects that will immediately relieve supply chain congestion at Canadian ports, which launched on January 31, 2022, and will close on February 25, 2022. Funding decisions by the Minister are expected in Spring 2022 followed by the signing of contribution agreements and project implementation by September 2023.Footnote 33

Performance indicator:

  • Number of calls for proposals launched, implemented, and/or closed

Target:

  • Implementation and closure of the Relieving Supply Chain Congestion at Canadian Ports and Increasing the Fluidity of Canada’s Supply Chains calls for proposals and announcement of associated funded projects by Spring 2022 and Fall 2022, respectively.

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:

The NTCF is guided by 4 objectives, including increasing the resilience of the Canadian transportation system in a changing climate. To be eligible for funding under the NTCF, projects must demonstrate how they advance the program’s objectives

All project proposals are reviewed and assessed on the degree to which the project supports or addresses climate change resilience, as well as how the project would promote sustainable transportation by reducing environmental impacts, including GHG and air contaminant emissions

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 9.1 - Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all

SDG Target 9.4 - By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

SDG Target 11.2 - By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons

National Trade Corridors

Clean Growth goal icon

Clean Growth: A growing clean technology industry in Canada contributes to clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy

Responsible Minister: Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister of Natural Resources

Clean Growth goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Clean Growth (Other actions that support the Goal but do not directly support a FSDS Contributing Action and do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Other
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address, under the Core Clean Transportation Research, Development and Demonstration – Aviation, Marine and Rail Transportation Program, greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions from aviation, marine and rail transportation through targeted research on emerging technologies and innovative practices

Aviation: High quality research projects are selected for funding by Transport Canada in the current priority areas of: emissions contributing to climate change, air pollutant emissions and aviation fuels. These research areas are selected in accordance with current identified priorities of the Department and within the industry in general

Rail: Supporting projects to address GHG emissions from the rail sector by testing advanced technologies and innovative practices to inform the development of regulations, as well as industry codes and standards, in order to ensure that new technologies can be introduced in Canada in a safe, secure and timely manner

Marine: Supporting projects to address GHG emissions from the marine sector by testing advanced technologies and innovative practices to inform the development of regulations, as well as industry codes and standards, in order to ensure that new technologies can be introduced in Canada in a safe, secure and timely manner

* Given this work contributes to the reduction of GHGs and air pollutants, this departmental action also supports both the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy’s (FSDS) “Effective Action on Climate Change” and “Safe and Healthy Communities” goals

Starting Point 1:

In 2019 to 2020,

  • rail research projects  included a Hyperloop Feasibility Study and a Rail Innovation in Canada Scan that identified the top ten most promising rail technologies
  • marine research projects included  a small vessel electrification pilot project; assessing the effectiveness of hull coatings on vessel emissions; assessing the effectiveness of hull and propeller cleaning on vessel energy efficiency and emissions. The program also launched a new $4.7M call for proposals to advance the development and testing of clean technology solutions for the marine sector
  • aviation research projects included a project to develop a novel calibration method for instruments measuring emissions from aircraft engines, and an inflight study of contrail characteristics when various fuels are used

Performance indicator 1:

  1. Number of priority areas in which Transport Canada has funded high quality research projects.
  2. Funded research projects provide evidence used to support policy making, regulatory development, and the development of negotiating positions

Target 1:

For research projects:

  1. at least 1 project in each identified priority area is funded each year
  2. 80% of funded projects provide evidence/data which is used to support policy making, regulatory development, and the development of negotiating positions

Starting Point 2:

As of March 31, 2020, 29% of the grant funding envelope has been invested into 13 projects

Performance indicator 2:

  1. Percentage of federal grant funding envelope (an overall $3 million funding envelope) invested to address GHG and air pollutant emissions from aviation, marine and rail transportation, through calls for proposals for research on emerging technologies and innovative practices
  2. Number of projects funded by federal grants to study and advance emerging technologies and innovative practices related to addressing GHG and air pollutant emissions from aviation, marine and rail transportationFootnote 34

Target 2:

  1. 80% of the grant funding envelope invested
  2. at least 30 projects funded by March 31, 2023

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

By collaborating with research partners, the department will contribute to improved air quality in Canadian communities and reduced GHG emissions, by supporting research that improves the measurement, impact assessment and mitigation of aviation, marine and rail emissions

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

SDG Target 9.4 - By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

SDG Target 13.2 - Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Climate Change and Clean Air

Healthy Coasts and Oceans goal icon

Healthy Coasts and Oceans: Coasts and oceans support healthy, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

Healthy Coasts and Oceans goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Healthy Coasts and Oceans (Other actions that support the Goal and a FSDS Contributing Action but do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Work with partners to protect and restore coastal ecosystems
Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans
Protect and manage marine and coastal areas
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar I: A State-of-the-Art Marine Safety System

Pillar 1- Initiatives involved in enhancing the prevention of marine incidents include:

  • new information-sharing systems - the Government of Canada will work with Indigenous and coastal communities to design new information-sharing systems and platforms so they have access to real-time information on marine shipping activities to support safer navigation in local waters
  • pilot project to enhance marine weather services to support marine traffic operations and improve safety in higher-risk areas
  • Proactive Vessel Management - allow those involved in the marine safety system – governments, communities, Indigenous groups – to inform local traffic management
  • safer resupply in Arctic communities – funding new tools and equipment to unload essential goods in northern communities
  • stronger polluter-pay principle – remove the per-incident limit of liability on Canada’s Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund to provide unlimited compensation to responders and victims of a ship-source oil spill
  • places of refuge:  Pre-identifying potential coastal locations where a ship in need of assistance can take action to stabilize the condition of the vessel in order to protect human life and the environment. The department is revising its National Places of Refuge Contingency Plan based on the results of engagement activities, research and the addition of new regional annexes
  • Anchorages Initiative - Research and analyze the environmental, economic, social, safety and security impacts of anchorages
  • Seamless Regime Response – develop a broad and integrated framework for preparedness and response to all spills beyond ship-source oil

Initiatives involved in strengthening of responses to marine incidents include:

  • a stronger Canadian Coast Guard - The Canadian Coast Guard’s command systems will be strengthened where gaps have been identified. The Coast Guard will be given greater power to intervene directly to prevent marine incidents, such as where ship operators have been reluctant to act
  • increased emergency response: 24/7 response capacity will be established to effectively manage marine incidents; and baseline environmental data on B.C.’s North Coast will be collected
  • enhance ECCC’s capacity to enforce wildlife and environmental laws for the east and west coasts, and expand set of 3D ocean products and enhance service by making it available 24/7
  • increased towing capacity - towing kits will be added to major Canadian Coast Guard vessels on the East and West to improve the capability to take swift action. Two new vessels will be leased with the ability to tow large commercial ships in distress
  • alternative response measures (ARMs) – research and policy on ARMs – such as dispersants and in-situ burning – that could be used only when there is an environmental benefit to do so

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

Initiatives under the current OPP program sunset in March 2022. Work is currently underway to continue to implement commitments made under the Oceans Protection Plan with the support of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, TC is working to launch the next phase of the Oceans Protection Plan to continue efforts to deliver world-leading marine safety systems, increase protection for marine species and ecosystems and create stronger partnerships with Indigenous and other coastal communities, while strengthening marine research and science. Progress reporting from previous years can be found here: Transport Canada's 2020-2021 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report

 

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, marine protected areas and fisheries
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar II: Preservation and Restoration of Marine Ecosystems

Pillar 2 - Preservation and Restoration of Marine Ecosystems initiatives include:

  • collection of baseline data and cumulative effects assessment - working closely with Indigenous and coastal communities, the Government of Canada will create a pilot baseline program to better understand the cumulative effects of shipping on coastal ecosystems
  • protect aquatic ecosystems - new measures will be funded that implement a real-time whale detection system to alert mariners to the presence of whales, which will help them avoid interactions and vessel strikes
  • addressing abandoned and wrecked vessels - the Government is implementing a national strategy that focuses on the prevention and removal of these problem vessels

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

Initiatives under the current OPP program sunset in March 2022. Work is currently underway to continue to implement commitments made under the Oceans Protection Plan with the support of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, TC is working to launch the next phase of the Oceans Protection Plan to continue efforts to deliver world-leading marine safety systems, increase protection for marine species and ecosystems and create stronger partnerships with Indigenous and other coastal communities, while strengthening marine research and science. Progress reporting from previous years can be found here: Transport Canada's 2020-2021 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report

 

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Work with partners to protect and restore coastal ecosystems
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar III: Indigenous Partnerships

  • The Government will create opportunities for Indigenous communities to participate and play an active role in responsible shipping and the marine safety regime

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

Initiatives under the current OPP program sunset in March 2022. Work is currently underway to continue to implement commitments made under the Oceans Protection Plan with the support of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, TC is working to launch the next phase of the Oceans Protection Plan to continue efforts to deliver world-leading marine safety systems, increase protection for marine species and ecosystems and create stronger partnerships with Indigenous and other coastal communities, while strengthening marine research and science. Progress reporting from previous years can be found here: Transport Canada's 2020-2021 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report

 

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, marine protected areas and fisheries
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Implement the Oceans Protection Plan – Pillar IV: A Stronger Evidence Base and Increased Community Participation and Public Awareness

Will not be included in 2022-2023 Progress Report.

Initiatives under the current OPP program sunset in March 2022. Work is currently underway to continue to implement commitments made under the Oceans Protection Plan with the support of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, TC is working to launch the next phase of the Oceans Protection Plan to continue efforts to deliver world-leading marine safety systems, increase protection for marine species and ecosystems and create stronger partnerships with Indigenous and other coastal communities, while strengthening marine research and science. Progress reporting from previous years can be found here: Transport Canada's 2020-2021 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report

 

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, marine protected areas and fisheries
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Support the protection and recovery of Canada’s endangered whale populations through research and monitoring

Starting point:

World-leading underwater listening station (ULS) in Boundary Pass continues to capturing underwater noise data in real-time from vessels in both inbound and outbound shipping lanes, as well as ambient noise and marine mammal calls

Performance indicator:

  • Number of management measures to support the protection and recovery of Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) that are informed by the data collected on underwater vessel noise from the ULS

Target:

  • Underwater vessel noise database will be used to help develop at least 1 management measure by March 31, 2024  to support the protection and recovery of the SRKW from the impacts of vessel noise

Starting point:

Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) – or drone – supports aerial surveillance in the Dynamic Shipping Zone in the Gulf of St. Lawrence to detect the presence of North Atlantic right whales (NARW)

Performance indicator:

  • Integrational refinement of the RPAS to support management of dynamic measures for the protection of NARW

Target:

  • RPAS contributes to support management of dynamic measures, for the protection of NARW starting in 2020 and continuing through 2022

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada is conducting research on underwater noise and supporting development of technologies for detection and monitoring of endangered whales to support their protection and recovery

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Protect and manage marine and coastal areas
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Support the protection and recovery of Canada’s endangered whale populations through management measures

Starting Point:

On February 18, 2021, the Government of Canada announced its 2021 measures to protect the endangered North Atlantic right whale (NARW) including vessel speed restriction measures to reduce the risk of lethal collisions with NARW

For 2021, the Government of Canada partnered again with the Vancouver Port Authority's Enhancing Cetacean Habitat and Observation (ECHO) Program to implement a vessel slowdown during the summer of 2021 in Haro Strait and Boundary Pass and at Swiftsure Bank, along with a lateral displacement of vessels in the Strait of Juan de Fuca in the Salish Sea

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of ships that are compliant with slowdown measures that mitigate the impacts of vessel traffic on marine species

Target:

  • By March 2022, at least 85% of ships 20 metres and greater to comply with vessel slowdown measures

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Every year, Transport Canada is implementing management measures on the East and West Coasts to support the protection and recovery of Canada’s endangered whale populations

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Set the legal and regulatory frameworks through domestic legislation and international conventions that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution, and advance Canadian positions on reducing and managing global marine pollution from ships

Starting Point:

In order to measure Transport Canada’s success in protecting Canada’s oceans and marine environment from ship source oil pollution

Transport Canada’s NASP monitors the number of vessels using the Automatic Identification System (AIS), vessel overflights and the number of ship-source oil spills detected over 10 litres. Smaller spills are typically non-recoverable and have a negligible impact on the environment

The rate of ship-source oil spills is calculated per hours flown, per year

In 2019 to 2020, the National Aerial Surveillance Program monitored 338,575 vessels using AIS, 31,335 overflights and detected six ship source spills over 10 litresFootnote 35

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage of actual vs forecasted pollution patrol hours conducted

Target 1:

  • 90% of actual pollution patrols are conducted as planned

Performance indicator 2:

  • Number of vessels monitored using AIS per hour flown

Target 2:

  • Vessels monitored at a rate of 80 per hour using the AIS

Performance indicator 3:

  • Number of vessels overflown per hour

Target 3:

  • Vessels overflown at a rate of 5.5 per hour

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

The update of the Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations will further promote the elimination of deliberate, negligent or accidental discharge of vessel-source pollutants into the marine environment therefore reducing the negative impacts of shipping in further harmonizing and providing consistent standards for vessels as set out under MARPOL Convention. These new regulations will lead to increase protection of the marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, and thereby contribute to maintaining the health of Canada’s waters

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

SDG Target 17.7 - Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Contribute to reducing pollution from vessels by monitoring compliance of marine transportation firms with Canadian legislation, such as the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, through the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP), inspections, audits, monitoring and enforcement

Starting Point:

In order to measure Transport Canada’s success in protecting Canada’s oceans and marine environment from ship source oil pollution

Transport Canada’s NASP monitors the number of vessels using the Automatic Identification System (AIS), vessel overflights and the number of ship-source oil spills detected over 10 litres. Smaller spills are typically non-recoverable and have a negligible impact on the environment

The rate of ship-source oil spills is calculated per hours flown, per year

In 2019 to 2020, the National Aerial Surveillance Program monitored 338,575 vessels using AIS, 31,335 overflights and detected six ship source spills over 10 litresFootnote 35

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage of actual vs forecasted pollution patrol hours conducted

Target 1:

  • 90% of actual pollution patrols are conducted as planned

Performance indicator 2:

  • Number of vessels monitored using AIS per hour flown

Target 2:

  • Vessels monitored at a rate of 80 per hour using the AIS

Performance indicator 3:

  • Number of vessels overflown per hour

Target 3:

  • Vessels overflown at a rate of 5.5 per hour

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada’s NASP conducts aerial pollution patrols over waters under Canadian jurisdiction to monitor shipping activities; thus acting as a deterrent to potential polluters. The evidence collected is forwarded to enforcement authorities for further review and investigation

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG 14 - Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

SDG 17 - Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Update the regulatory framework for protecting the marine environment from the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species by ships’ ballast water, giving effect to the international Ballast Water Convention, to which Canada is party

*this departmental action also contributes to the ‘Pristine Lakes and Rivers’ Goal

Starting Point:

On June 8, 2019 Transport Canada published new proposed Ballast Water Regulations in the Canada Gazette Part I

Performance indicator:

  • Canada’s Ballast Water Control Management Regulations are updated in accordance with the requirements of the Ballast Water Convention that came into force worldwide in September of 2017

Target:

  • By March 2023, Transport Canada intends to have finalized and implemented new Ballast Water Regulations

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Updated Ballast Water regulations will require ships carrying ballast water in Canada to take actions that reduce the risk of introducing and spreading aquatic invasive species

In particular, ships will be required to limit the concentration of viable organisms in the ballast water they carry, per Regulation D-2 of the international Ballast Water Convention

These new Ballast Water regulations will lead to increased protection of aquatic ecosystems from invasive species, and thereby contribute to protecting the health of Canada’s coasts and oceans (and lakes and rivers)

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

SDG Target 15.8 - By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Monitor marine transportation firms and vessels for compliance with the Ballast Water RegulationsFootnote 36, and as amended.

*this departmental action also contributes to the ‘Pristine Lakes and Rivers’ Goal

Starting Point:

Transport Canada receives completed ballast water reporting forms on methods used by ships to comply with ballast water management regulations (Ballast exchange or via a Ballast Water Management System)

Performance indicator:

Target:

  • 100% of vessels will be compliant or they will be requested to manage their ballast water in a manner that is not a threat to the Canadian Ecosystem

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Ensuring that marine transportation firms and vessels comply with the Ballast Water Regulations helps to prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species in Canada, and thereby contributes to protecting the health of Canada’s coasts and oceans (and lakes and rivers)

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

SDG Target 15.8 - By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

FSDS Contributing Action: Use legislation and regulations to protect lake and river ecosystems
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Monitor the compliance of vessels arriving from overseas and bound for the Great Lakes with current ballast water requirements, as well as cooperative enforcement with the U.S. in accordance with Annex 5 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement

*this departmental action also contributes to the ‘Pristine Lakes and Rivers’ Goal

Starting Point:

Transport Canada receives completed ballast water reporting forms on methods used by ships to comply with ballast water management regulations (via ballast water exchange or a ballast water management system)

Performance indicator:

Target:

  • 100% of vessels entering the Great Lakes from outside of Canadian waters will continue to be inspected for their compliance with ballast water management requirements, including for mid-ocean exchange to protect the Great Lakes ecosystems

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Ensuring that vessels arriving from overseas and bound for the Great Lakes comply with requirements before arrival helps to prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species in Canada, and thereby contributes to protecting the health of Canada’s coasts and oceans (and lakes and rivers) 

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 14.2 - By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

SDG Target 15.8 - By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species

Protecting Oceans and Waterways

Lakes and Rivers goal icon

Pristine Lakes and Rivers: Clean and healthy lakes and rivers support economic prosperity and the well-being of Canadians

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Lakes and Rivers goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Pristine Lakes and Rivers (Other actions that support the Goal but do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Other
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Transport Canada’s ballast water actions have been included under the FSDS Goal: Healthy Coasts and Oceans. Preventing the introduction of aquatic invasive species in Canada contributes to protecting the health of Canada’s lakes and rivers.

For detailed information on these actions, please see the Healthy Coasts and Oceans Goal.

Communities goal icon

Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

Note: Transport Canada’s actions that reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, such as the Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative, ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles Program, and the Heavy-Duty Vehicle Retrofit Requirements Program, have been included under the FSDS Goal: Effective Action on Climate Change. Reducing air pollutants contributes to creating healthier communities for Canadians. For detailed information on these actions, please see the Effective Action on Climate Change Goal

Communities goal icon

FSDS Target: Actions supporting the Goal: Safe and Healthy Communities
(Other actions that support the Goal and may support a FSDS Contributing Action but do not directly support a FSDS target)

FSDS Contributing Action: Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high-priority federal contaminated sites owned by Transport Canada

Starting Point:

From 2016-17 to 2019-20 (FCSAP Phase III), 11% of Transport Canada FCSAP-funded sites completed remediation/risk management work

Transport Canada reduced environmental liability in 2019 to 2020 at its highest priority federal contaminated sites by 99.5% of its remediation expenditures

FCSAP annual reports can be found at:

https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/federal-contaminated-sites/publications.html

Performance indicator 1:  

  • Percentage of Transport Canada FCSAP-funded sites during Phase IV that have completed remediation/risk management work

Target 1:

  • By March 31, 2025, 25% of Transport Canada FCSAP-funded sites during Phase IV have completed remediation/risk management work

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percentage of Transport Canada remediation expenditures at FCSAP funded remediation sites that reduce liability each fiscal year

Target 2:

  • Annually, 95% of Transport Canada remediation expenditures at FCSAP funded sites reduce the environmental liability

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Transport Canada contributes to an environmentally responsible and resilient national transportation system by ensuring that we:

  • reduce risks to human health and the environment as more contaminated sites are remediated; and
  • reduce environmental liability at the department’s highest priority federal contaminated sites by reducing the risk to human health or the environment

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

SDG Target 15.3 - By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world

Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

FSDS Contributing Action: Other
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Address, under the Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative, air pollutant emissions from aviation by supporting the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) development of new international standards and recommended practices and through the development and implementation of new domestic standards

Canada has domestic regulatory instruments in place for nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM), carbon monoxide (CO), & unburned hydrocarbons (HC) emissions from aircraft engines. Work is ongoing to incorporate a new nvPM mass and number standard into the Canadian Aviation Regulations. These instruments align Canada with ICAO’s international standards

Piston powered aircraft use aviation gasoline fuel, which contains a low level of lead. There is currently no unleaded fuel option that is approved and safe for use for all piston-powered aircraft operating in Canada.  Lead is one of the top ten toxic substances listed in the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA). The Gasoline Regulations, under CEPA, prohibit the use of lead in fuels, however Canada has an exemption in place to allow for the use of low lead aviation gasoline fuel due to safety issues. Canada is collaborating with others to find a suitable unleaded fuel, such that the exemption can be removed

Starting Point:

A new standard for non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) mass and number will be incorporated into Canadian regulations in order to align with ICAO Standards

Transport Canada is working in collaboration with others to advance the transition to unleaded aviation gasoline for piston engine aircraft

Performance indicator 1:

  • A new ICAO nvPM mass and number standard is implemented into the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs)

Target 1:

  • New nvPM standard is incorporated into the CARs by December 2022

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percentage of regulatees who comply with existing emissions standards for NOx, nvPM, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and with the new nvPM mass and number standard, once implemented

Target 2:

  • 100% compliance to emissions standards

Performance indicator 3:

  • Research and testing on unleaded aviation gasoline candidate fuels

Target 3:

On an annual basis, research and testing has been conducted. Additional evidence is generated

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Canada’s work with ICAO to build consensus on international agreements that reflect Canadian objectives will contribute to further advancing international standards and recommended practices for air pollutant and harmful substance reductions, which will be implemented domestically

The new nvPM mass and number standard represents tighter emissions controls that will reduce potential negative health impacts experienced by Canadians in association with exposure to air pollutants

Transport Canada is collaborating with national and international partners on research to advance scientific understanding in this area, with the ultimate goal of finding an unleaded replacement fuel so that the exemption to the Gasoline Regulations can be removed in the future

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

Climate Change and Clean Air

FSDS Contributing Action: Other
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Under the Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative, limit criteria air contaminant (or air pollutant) emissions from the rail sector through the Locomotive Emissions Regulations

Starting Point:

The Locomotive Emissions Regulations entered into force in June 2017

Performance indicator 1:

  • Percentage of railway companies (regulatees) who comply with the reporting requirements under the Locomotive Emissions Regulations by filing Annual Reports and In-use Test Reports with Transport Canada

Target 1:

  • 100% of railway companies (regulatees) per year that comply with the reporting requirements under the Locomotive Emissions Regulations

Performance indicator 2:

  • Percentage of locomotives operated by railway companies (regulatees) that meet an emission standard, based on the information reported to Transport Canada in the Annual Reports

Target 2:

Positive change (increase) per year in the percentage of locomotives that meet an emission standard

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:  

Contribute to reducing air pollutant emissions from locomotives by promoting, monitoring, and enforcing compliance with the Locomotive Emissions Regulations, which is good for the health and quality of life of all Canadians. To comply with the Locomotive Emissions Regulations, railway companies must meet regulatory requirements, including emission standards for new locomotives, carry out emission testing and file reports with Transport Canada

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

SDG Target 11.6 - By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

Climate Change and Clean Air

Prevent environmental emergencies or mitigate their impacts
Corresponding departmental actions Starting points
Performance indicators
Targets
Contribution by each departmental result to the
FSDS goal and target
Program in which the departmental actions will occur

Prevention

Transportation of Dangerous Goods policy and regulatory plan seeks to ensure compliance within industry by anticipating/responding to issues related to the transportation of dangerous goods. This includes:

  • conducting education, outreach and awareness activities to ensure that the industry knows its legal and regulatory responsibilities
  • bringing Canada’s regulations in line with international codes; and
  • maintaining an effective oversight regime that seeks to guarantee regulatory compliance and carry out enforcement when warranted

Mitigation

Transportation of Dangerous Goods employs several strategies to mitigate emergencies involving dangerous goods, such as:

  • requiring the development of Emergency Response Assistance Plans (ERAPs), to ensure that industry knows what to do in the event of a release or anticipated release of certain higher-risk dangerous goods while in transport
  • dispatching Remedial Measures Specialists (RMSs) to the location of dangerous goods emergencies to promote public safety by monitoring remedial measures taken to mitigate the incident

The Canadian Transport Emergency Centre (CANUTEC) is a national advisory service that assists emergency response personnel in handling dangerous goods emergencies on a 24/7 basis

Starting Point:

The rate of reportable releases for 2019 to 2020 was 202.64

Performance indicator:

  • Rate of reportable releases of dangerous goods per year (the number of reportable releases divided by the nominal Canadian Gross Domestic Product for the year)

Target:

  • 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the rate of reportable releases in the previous year

Note:

A reportable release means either:

  • an actual release has occurred where the amount of dangerous goods released meets the minimum threshold specified by regulation considered to endanger public safety, where “public safety” is defined as the safety of human life and health and of property and the environment; or
  • a release of dangerous goods is expected to occur.

Canadian regulations have been updated to include “anticipated releases” as reportable as of December 1, 2016 (SOR/2016-95 May 13, 2016). Some possible examples of an anticipated release include:

  1. an incident has occurred and dangerous goods will likely have to be transferred to another container;
  2. a container is damaged to the extent that its integrity is compromised and dangerous goods could be released; or
  3. a container is lost in navigable waters

Continued efforts by the department are made to reduce number of reportable dangerous goods incidents per year. Since December 2016, companies have to report both a release and anticipated release to the Minister within 30 days of the initial report made to CANUTEC, and the reporting levels are expected to remain steady with improved industry reporting requirement awareness

Contribution to FSDS goal/target:

Prevention

The primary mandate of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Act and Regulations is to promote public safety. This also includes the prevention of dangerous goods releases and incidents. The departmental actions will directly lead to more effective prevention of incidents throughout Canada

Mitigation

In the event of a dangerous goods incident, Transport Canada may send a TDG Inspector or a TDG Remedial Measures Specialist (RMS). The primary role of the RMS is to promote public safety by monitoring remedial measures taken to mitigate the incident by emergency response personnel. The items listed under “Mitigation” in the departmental actions allow Transport Canada to minimize the effects of an incident, ensuring Canadians stay safe and healthy

Contribution to UNSDGs:

SDG Target 3.9 - By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination

TDG Regulatory Framework

TDG Oversight

TDG Technical Support

Section 4: Integrating sustainable development

All proposals seeking Ministerial or Cabinet approval, including Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions and Regulatory Updates are required to complete a STAT under departmental policy. Subject matter experts on the initiative complete the STAT in consultation with the Environmental Management Branch contact on SEA.

There are four possible outcomes of the STAT preliminary scan, each requiring written justification and director general-level approval before submission to Minister/ Cabinet:

  1. Cabinet exemption for situations where SEA is impractical or duplicative:
    • Urgent or emergency situations where time limitations prevent SEA from being completed;
    • Similar assessment has already been conducted, for example:
      1. Assessment under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 or Impact Assessment Act;
      2. Treasury Board submission for an initiative already assessed as part of a previous Memorandum to Cabinet;
      3. Transport Canada is contributing to an initiative led and already assessed by another department.
  2. Departmental exclusion for common types of proposals that do not have impacts on the environment:
    • Progress/performance reports to Cabinet or Treasury Board Secretariat;
    • Renewals or extensions of a program;
    • Summaries of program objectives and achievements given through Government response to Standing Committees;
    • Communications strategies; and
    • Changes that are administrative in nature with no environmental, economic or societal implications.
  3. Full STAT and formal determination on the need for detailed SEA. The general areas of consideration in the STAT are provided below. Impacts to FSDS goals and targets are also considered. Potential impacts are evaluated using Rating Guidelines within the STAT specific to each assessment criteria.

    STAT Areas of Consideration
    Economy Society Environment
    Movement of goods Safety Air
    Movement of people Security Water
    Financial costs System access and accessibility Wildlife and habitat
    Trade and commerce Human health Soil
    Adaptive capacity Communities Natural resources

    Transport Canada is currently undertaking a review of the STAT to find opportunities to strengthen the assessment of departmental proposals and better determine their potential for important environmental effects, with updates to be completed by March 31, 2023.

     
  4. A detailed SEA is required when there is potential for important impacts (positive or negative) on the environment. Public statements on the results of assessments are prepared when an initiative has undergone a detailed SEA. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

Transport Canada’s Environmental Management Branch tracks SEAs for initiatives going forward for Ministerial or Cabinet approval, including the number of approved initiatives for which an SEA has been completed, departmental compliance rate with SEA policy and public reporting on initiatives requiring a detailed SEA.