Transport Canada Departmental Plan 2020-21

 
Copyright

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Transport, 2020, Ottawa, Canada

Catalogue No. T1-27E-PDF

ISSN 2371-8420

This document is available on the Transport Canada website.

This document is available in alternative formats upon request.

Table of contents

From the Minister

I am pleased to present Transport Canada’s Departmental Plan for 2020–21. It outlines for parliamentarians and Canadians what Transport Canada does and what it plans to achieve.

Transport Canada ensures that Canada’s transportation system is safe, secure, environmentally responsible, and efficient in moving people and goods.

This plan explains how the department will assess and measure:

  • the effectiveness of its work;
  • how resources align with priorities; and
  • how it adapts to events as they unfold, to get the results Canadians demand and deserve.

Under Transportation 2030, we are improving how the various parts of Canada’s transportation system are integrated. This supports economic growth, job creation, and Canada’s middle class.

Transport Canada is working to improve trade corridors, advance the Oceans Protection Plan, achieve Zero-emission vehicles targets, and modernize departmental operations – to name a few examples. It is also taking steps to modernize laws and regulations under its authority. Modernized laws and regulations must be effective and based on risk. They must also encourage and allow for innovation.

Modernization is a key theme for Transport Canada. We must be ready for new technologies, such as connected and automated vehicles. Modernization also means ensuring that people throughout the department – including those who work directly with Canadians, such as inspectors – have the modern tools they need to properly and effectively serve Canadians.

I am confident that Transport Canada will deliver on its commitments responsibly, efficiently, and with the best interests of Canadian citizens in mind. We are all aware of how important our country’s transportation system is for our economy, and for Canadians’ well-being.

The Prime Minister listed his priorities in my Minister’s mandate letter. I will deliver on those priorities. I will continue to ensure that Canada’s transportation system supports our ambitious economic growth and job creation agenda.

I look forward to continuing to work alongside the excellent, dedicated people of Transport Canada, as we face the challenges and opportunities 2020-21 will bring.

The Minister of Transport
The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.

Plans at a glance

Priority 1: Improve the performance and reliability of Canada’s transportation system to get products to market and grow our economy.

Key Planning Highlights for 2020-21:

  • Invest in Canada’s trade corridors to increase global market access for Canadian goods, including:
  • Continue the Ports Modernization Review with the goal of updating governance structures to promote investment in Canadian ports and help make Canada’s major ports among the most efficient in the world.
  • Complete the St. Lawrence Seaway Review.
  • Advance implementation of legislative amendments to improve access, transparency, efficiency and long-term investment in the Canadian freight rail system.
  • Modernize the legislative and regulatory framework by taking action to implement two new ministerial authorities to the Canada Transportation Act that were part of the 2019 annual Regulatory Modernization Bill. These new authorities:
    • remove barriers to digital services by allowing digital versions of physical documents or processes; and
    • allow exemptions to encourage innovation across the transportation regime.
  • Deliver the regulatory and policy commitments made in the 2018 Transportation Sector Regulatory Roadmap. These commitments will remove regulatory barriers to innovation and investment in the sector.

Priority 2: Provide greater choice, better service, lower costs and enhanced rights for consumers.

Key Planning Highlights for 2020-21:

  • Complete transferring the assets of the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority to an independent not-for-profit entity that will improve the passenger experience. This includes a clear service standard to limit the amount of time travellers wait in airport security checkpoints.
  • Implement and enforce Phase I of the Air Travel Performance Data Regulations to measure the effectiveness of the Air Passenger Protection Regulations at improving the experience of air travellers.
  • Work with partners to make the transportation system more accessible for persons with disabilities.
  • Monitor and enforce the recently approved merger of First Air and Canadian North to ensure that:
    • air travel in the North is fair and affordable;
    • capacity is maintained and improved as needed; and
    • northern travellers receive a high level of service.
  • Assess and make a recommendation to Cabinet on whether or not to approve the Air Canada – Transat acquisition including a monitoring and enforcement regime, plus terms and conditions.
  • Work with VIA Rail’s High Frequency Rail and the Canada Infrastructure Bank to finalize the assessment of the proposal to create VIA Rail’s High Frequency Rail in the Toronto-Ottawa-Montréal-Québec City Corridor and examine options for the future of intercity passenger rail services outside the Corridor.
  • Work with VIA Rail’s High Frequency Rail to make opportunities to travel to Canada’s National Parks more accessible and affordable.
  • Implement measures to strengthen the transparency, accountability and efficiency of Canadian airports.
  • Continue working with project partners to implement the Known Traveller Digital Identity pilot project.

Priority 3: Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable, and enhance Northern transportation infrastructure, while respecting commitments to Indigenous communities.

Key Planning Highlights for 2020-21:

  • Work with partners in implementing the Oceans Protection Plan to:
    • improve our marine safety system and prevent marine incidents;
    • improve our ability to respond to marine incidents;
    • preserve and restore our marine ecosystems;
    • advance the development of partnerships with Indigenous peoples; and
    • improve our understanding of how various types of oil and petroleum products behave when spilled in a marine environment.
  • Continue to develop and implement measures to protect whales from the negative effects of vessel traffic on Canada’s coasts.
  • Support trade and transportation infrastructure investments in Arctic and northern communities through:
  • Continue aerial pollution surveillance over all Canadian waters via the National Aerial Surveillance Program.
  • Support efforts to reduce the impacts of marine shipping on the environment and ecosystems.
  • Build on our engagement with provincial counterparts and representatives from the fishing sector to reduce risks to the lives and property of fishers.

Priority 4: Build a safer and more secure transportation system that Canadians trust.

Key Planning Highlights for 2020-21:

  • Increase the transparency of our safety and security oversight of the transportation system by publicly reporting on our compliance and enforcement activities.
  • Review measures to address impairment in the transportation sector.
  • Develop rules and regulations to reinforce railway safety in the areas of fatigue management, passenger equipment, track safety, and railway employee qualifications and training.
  • Continue to take action on the recommendations from the 2017-18 statutory review of the Railway Safety Act.
  • Finalize regulations for locomotive voice and video recorders.
  • Complete regulations to improve the security of passenger rail transportation.
  • Undertake a multi-department review of Marine Security Operations Centres to improve operational efficiencies.
  • Increase the availability of marine and surface inspectors in the North.
  • Integrate and modernize crucial Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail Security Regulations (TDG) databases into a system named "CORE" to:
    • support risk-based decision making for interventions regarding safety;
    • strengthen TDG operations by developing a registry of regulated entities that handle, offer for transport, transport or import dangerous goods; and
    • monitor regulatory compliance across the country.
  • Work with provincial and territorial partners, and the School Bus Safety Task Force to find ways to strengthen school bus safety, both inside and outside the bus, with a focus on seatbelts.
  • Work with stakeholders on developing safety guidance and assessment tools to support research, testing and deployment of connected and automated vehicles.
  • Implement measures to enhance the security of Canada’s Aviation System of the Future while ensuring great transparency and efficiency.
  • Advance aviation safety by:
    • updating regulations to reduce the administrative burden and compliance costs;
    • improving aviation safety surveillance; and
    • strengthening the capacity of aviation safety certification to meet industry service demands.

Priority 5: Reduce environmental impacts and embrace new technologies to improve Canadians’ lives.

Key Planning Highlights for 2020-21:

  • Continue to develop and implement measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from domestic and international transportation, and support government priorities under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change.
  • Work with the Ministers of Innovation, Science and Industry; Natural Resources; and Environment and Climate Change Canada to make progress on our zero-emission vehicle targets of:
    • 10% of new light-duty vehicles sales per year by 2025;
    • 30% by 2030; and
    • 100% by 2040.
  • Support domestic and international projects that contribute to the Government’s national strategy of zero plastic waste.
  • Enable the development and adoption of methods and technologies to reduce underwater noise from vessel traffic and its impact on endangered whales.
  • Address the threat of invasive species by responding to the International Maritime Organization’s International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004.
  • Work with other government departments on the proposed International Maritime Organization’s ban of the use of heavy fuel oil by ships in the Arctic.
  • Continue to support the implementation of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project including delivery of accommodation measures and responses to the Canada Energy Regulator's (formerly National Energy Board) recommendations.
  • Acquire a highly capable Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (drone) as a pilot project to increase coverage of the National Aerial Surveillance Program in the Arctic using new technology.
  • Evaluate emerging, disruptive technologies in order to develop up-to-date safety standards, codes and regulations.
  • Focus on Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (drones) by developing additional regulations, pilot projects, and strategies to encourage federal departments to work together.

Priority 6: Transform the design and delivery of programs and services to Canadians in order to adapt to a changing world.

Key Planning Highlights for 2020-21:

  • Improve TC’s online service experience and increase the number of services that are digitally available.
  • Adopt innovative, user-centric approaches to design priority programs and services, using data analytics and emerging technologies such as robotics, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality to transition to a more digital government.
  • Modernize fees by implementing the requirements of the Service Fees Act and plan to manage fees digitally, in the future.
  • Modernize how we oversee and deliver regulations by developing common, risk-informed digital inspection processes, and by providing inspectors with optimized data and tools.
  • Implement strategies to accelerate the deployment and adoption of innovative technologies in the transportation sector.
  • Create a data strategy that supports:
    • transparency and the public’s trust in us and our work;
    • open and accessible transportation data;
    • evidence-based decision making;
    • targeting public risks; and
    • delivering services and reporting on results.
  • Address barriers to program and service delivery, and innovation and data-sharing through regulatory and legislative modernization and policy design.

For more information on Transport Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results and resources” section of this report.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources

This section contains detailed information on the department’s planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities.

Core Responsibility 1: Safe and Secure Transportation System

Description

Ensures a safe and secure transportation system in Canada through laws, regulations, policies, and oversight activities.

Planning highlights

  • Improve evidence-based decision making by designing and implementing a model that assesses current and emerging risks to Canadians.
  • Support evidence-based policy and regulatory projects to address fatigue across modes. This includes:
    • introducing new work/rest rules and other ways of promoting a healthy work culture;
    • exploring the use of a fatigue risk management system; and
    • working with partners to develop innovative educational tools to reduce fatigue in the workplace.
  • Improve the investigative capacity of our Regional Enforcement Units through training and developing final organizational structures.
  • Maintain safety and security oversight to mitigate impairment in the workplace across modes and implement new safety measures in light of cannabis legalization and existing drug and alcohol policies by working with provincial/territorial, federal and international partners.
  • Develop modern, flexible and innovative safety policies for new and emerging technologies. Specifically, we will focus on:
  • Implement legislative changes and develop regulatory amendments further to the revised Motor Vehicle Safety Act. Bill S-2 strengthened the Minister of Transport’s road safety enforcement and compliance authorities, and added flexibility to help us keep pace with emerging technologies, such as connected and automated vehicles.
  • Work closely with our partners to strengthen commercial vehicle safety by building on the standard for entry-level commercial driver training.
  • Use regulatory sandboxes to test innovative technologies to advance safety and security regulatory regime.
  • Implement the harmonized national technical standard for electronic logging devices which is used to record driving hours on commercial vehicles.
  • Develop a governance structure and regular review cycle for the National Safety Code.
  • Assess measures identified by the Task Force on School Bus Safety for safer buses, both inside and out. In partnership with our provincial and territorial partners, we will explore pilot projects that can assess the operational considerations of using three-point seatbelts.
  • Invest in projects to improve rail safety, public education and awareness.
  • Strengthen emergency management across Transport Canada and ensure that our processes are aligned with the broader government-wide emergency management framework. Specifically, we will improve how we identify and mobilize staff and continue to deliver Incident Command System and Emergency Operation Centre training
  • Provide 24/7 support to emergency responders via the Transport Canada Situation Centre (SITCEN) and CANUTEC. The SITCEN, which serves as the department’s 24/7 point of contact for emergencies, ensures timely information sharing of safety and security incidents with key internal and external partners.
  • Develop a modernized service model for the Transportation Security Clearance Program that will improve system effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Create an action plan to identify compliance in transporting dangerous goods. We will achieve this by looking at provincial/territorial compliance data for road shipments, which will be supported by a national registry of regulated entities.
  • Develop and implement a policy and regulatory plan that anticipates and responds to issues related to transporting dangerous goods. This plan will:
    • allow for early consultations and meaningful engagement with stakeholders;
    • bring Canada’s regulations in line with international codes; and
    • help us adapt alongside industry, increase capacity, and strengthen regulations.
  • Develop and implement oversight programs that will support the Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail Security Regulations and the planned Passenger Rail Transportation Security Regulations.
  • Collaborate with domestic/international partners, including the UN and the US on research into:
    • the hazard, flammability and behaviour properties of distillates and crude oil;
    • lithium battery packaging in air cargo;
    • containment methods under non-ideal conditions;
    • new scientific research projects based on emerging trends and program needs annually; and
    • opportunities for alternative energy sources such as batteries, hydrogen and other technologies as a power source, and liquefied natural gas as an alternative fuel, for marine transportation.
  • Develop and maintain safety standards for means of containment including tank cars, highway tanks, intermediate bulk containers and cylinders.
  • Publish and distribute the 2020 edition of the Emergency Response Guidebook, in collaboration with the United States, Mexico, and Argentina, and share best practices with these countries.
  • Work with first responders, municipalities, Indigenous groups, industry and training schools to develop a Canadian flammable liquids curriculum that will help first responders protect the public after an incident that involves flammable liquids transported by rail.
  • Focus on our aviation safety regulatory framework by:
    • modernizing the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) to respond to emerging priorities and evolving technology in the aviation community;
    • using the Let’s Talk Transportation webpage and other approaches to engage and consult stakeholders; and
    • engaging with the international aviation community and strengthening Canada’s influence and regulatory expertise on the international stage.
  • Work with other federal departments and industry partners to make sure Canada’s aviation security system remains dynamic, efficient and effective so we can support our economic growth and optimize security.
  • Address the security risks posed by illegitimate remotely piloted aircraft systems (drones) by:
    • working with industry and experts in other government departments to develop guidance material for responding to a drone incident at an airport;
    • running pilot projects to test counter measures (e.g. technology) in airport environment; and
    • engaging with international partners on best practices for developing a strategic plan to address the risks and vulnerabilities of the aviation system.
  • Focus on remotely piloted aircraft systems (drones), including regulations for safe operations, pilot projects and interdepartmental collaboration, including our use of drones to monitor North Atlantic Right Whales in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
  • Launch the Known Traveller Digital Identity pilot project on some Air Canada and KLM flights between Amsterdam Schiphol International Airport and Toronto Pearson International Airport or Montreal Trudeau International Airport.
  • Implement a certification program for explosives detection dogs and handler teams. This program will improve aviation security and provide cargo and mail stakeholders with a more flexible way to screen air cargo.
  • Strengthen our Aviation Safety Certification Team’s ability to meet industry service demands through the Aircraft Certification Enhanced Activity initiative. This initiative will help keep Canada's aerospace sector competitive, while ensuring high levels of safety.
  • Help reduce pollution from vessels by monitoring marine transportation firms to make sure they follow Canadian legislation, like the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. We plan to accomplish this through:
  • Modernize our regulatory and oversight frameworks for marine safety and security by:
    • making stronger regulations for navigation safety and radio communication networks. This will reduce risks and help with search and rescue operations. It will also align the regulations with international requirements. Additionally, we’ll respond to recommendations on carrying navigation safety equipment onboard vessels;
    • working with domestic and international maritime security partnersFootnote 1 creating information exchange protocols and planning coordinated responses to maritime security threats.
    • updating the Marine Personnel Regulations to set requirements for seafarers to be properly certified and trained, protect their health and well-being, and to make sure that the regulations are consistent with standard practices in the marine industry;
    • implementing the Vessel Construction and Equipment Regulations to make sure that Canadian requirements for the construction and equipment of new vessels meet modern standards and industry best practices;
    • updating the Safety Management Regulations to set requirements for companies and vessels to put in place safety management systems so that they can better adapt to evolving technologies in the marine industry. The goal is to reduce the number of shipping related deaths and injuries;
    • amending the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations to improve overall safety in the marine industry; and
    • making sure that vessels and Canadian marine facilities and ports are safe and that Canada meets its international marine security obligations by harmonizing regulatory requirements.
  • Protect Canada’s navigable waters by implementing the new Canadian Navigable Waters Act. This includes:
    • working to create new partnerships with Indigenous peoples;
    • updating the Minor Works Order;
    • launching a new process for Canadians and Indigenous peoples to nominate the addition of navigable waters for the Act’s schedule (list of protected waters); and
    • consulting the public on proposed cost recovery and administrative fines.

Gender-based analysis plus

Our programs within Core Responsibility 1, “A Safe and Secure Transportation System”, have identified many GBA+ initiatives and issues that we are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to carry out in the coming fiscal year and beyond. Most notably:

  • Being leaders at international forums like the International Maritime Organization’s to encourage the marine industry to move from a male-dominated workforce by increasing the representation of women.
  • Putting in place initiatives, such as the Marine Training Program, to reduce barriers to marine training for underrepresented groups, such as women and Indigenous peoples.
  • Improving regulatory frameworks, such as the safe integration of remotely piloted aircraft systems (drones) into Canadian airspace, by assessing the impact that new regulations could have on Canadians from identifiable groups such as Indigenous peoples as well as by gender, age, and geographic location.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)Footnote 2

Under United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being, it is expected that Target 3.6, pertaining to the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents, will be renewed at the 3rd Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety. We will be supporting the formulation of the new target, and develop actions to achieve continuous progress in reducing road traffic death and injuries in Canada.

Experimentation

The goal of the Known Traveller Digital Identity pilot project initiative is to allow passengers to share their information with aviation stakeholders. This will make travel by plane easier, while still maintaining high security standards. The initiative takes advantage of the benefits of new technologies like blockchain, cryptography, and biometrics.

With this pilot project, we are:

  • assessing the impact of blockchain on the aviation sector;
  • testing the impact of biometrics on stakeholders compliance with identity verification regulations; and
  • looking at how digital identities and biometrics can make it quicker for passengers to go through airport security in Canada.

New approaches for testing innovative technologies and processes that will help us develop regulations or non-regulatory methods of ensuring safety and security, such as:

  • using pilot projects to test remotely-piloted aircraft systems (drones) beyond the visual line-of-sight; and
  • a pilot project for the Increased Delegation of Authority to Manufacturers for Issuing Flight Permits.

We support evidence-based decision making by using insights from behavioural science to inform policy and guidance for safety and security activities. Examples include:

  • Inviting a fellow from the Privy Council Office’s Fellowship Program to work at Transport Canada to find innovative behavioural science techniques to deal with complex policy issues across government.
  • We will include insights from behavioural science into department-wide projects such as:
    • fatigue management;
    • instruments of choice to address safety and security issues;
    • encouraging recreational boaters to wear lifejackets; and
    • vehicle incidents at rail crossings.

Planned results for A Safe and Secure Transportation System

Result 1: A safe transportation system
Departmental result Departmental result Indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
1a) A safe transportation system Ten-year aircraft accident rateFootnote 3 (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year 2021-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator 3.2 per 100,000 movements
1b) A safe transportation system Ten-year aircraft fatality rate (average per year, per 100,000 aircraft movements) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year 2021-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator 0.7 per 100,000 movements
1c) A safe transportation system Ten-year marine accident rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels)Footnote 4 Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator 8.8 per 1,000 commercial vessels
1d) A safe transportation system Ten-year marine fatality rate (average per year, per 1,000 commercial vessels) Target is for the rate to not increase year-over-year N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator 0.45 per 1,000 commercial vessels
1e) A safe transportation system Ten-year rail accident rate (average per year, per million-train miles) 5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five yearsFootnote 5 2021-12-31 N/A - New Indicator 3.7% reduction 5.2% reduction
1f) A safe transportation system Ten-year rail fatality rate (average per year, per million-train miles) 5% reduction in the rate as compared to the average of previous five years 2021-12-31 N/A - New Indicator 12.5% reduction 26% reduction
1g) A safe transportation system Rate of reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years 2021-03-31 2.9% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14) 6.8% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011-15) 5.2% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012-16)
1h) A safe transportation system Rate of serious injuries in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five yearsFootnote 6 2021-03-31 7.0% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14) 6.8% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011-15) 13.4% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012-16)
1i) A safe transportation system Rate of fatalities in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada (rate per billion vehicle kilometres travelled) 1% reduction in the rate for current year as compared to the average of the previous five years 2021-03-31 12.7% reduction in 2015 as compared to the five year average (2010-14) 9.5% reduction in 2016 as compared to the five year average (2011-15) 10.9% reduction in 2017 as compared to the five year average (2012-16)
1j) A safe transportation system Number of reportable dangerous goods accidents per yearFootnote 7 TBDFootnote 8 TBD N/A New indicator N/A New indicator N/A New indicator
Result 2: A secure transportation system
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
2a) A secure transportation system Rate of refusals of new Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 new Transportation Security Clearance applications) N/AFootnote 9 N/A 113.17 89.25 91.74
2b) A secure transportation system Rate of suspensions of Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 Transportation Security Clearance holders) N/AFootnote 10 N/A 9.30 8.68 10.29
2c) A secure transportation system Rate of cancellations of Transportation Security Clearance applications (per 10,000 Transportation Security Clearance holders) N/AFootnote 11 N/A 5.63 6.90 5.46
2d) A secure transportation system Rate of compliance of air sector operators with Transport Canada’s security regulationsFootnote 12 90% 2021-03-31 88.94% 90.08% 91.8%
2e) A secure transportation system Rate of compliance of marine sector operators with Transport Canada’s security regulationsFootnote 13 80% 2021-03-31 77% 84% 76%
Result 3: A modern safety and security regime that support economic growth
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
3a) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of new Canadian Rail Safety operating and equipment safety rules aligned with the US Rail Safety operating and equipment rules 80% 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
3b) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada safety regulations aligned with international transportation standards (air) 100% 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
3c) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada safety regulations aligned with international transportation standards (marine) 90% 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
3d) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada security regulations aligned with international transportation standards (marine) 90% 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
3e) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of client requests for safety authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards (transportation of dangerous goods) TBD To be determined N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A
3f) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of Transport Canada aviation security regulations that align with international transportation standards 90% 2021-03-31 100% 100% 100%
3g) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of aviation client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standardsFootnote 14 83% 2021-03-31 79% 71% 84%
3h) A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth Percentage of marine client requests for safety or security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards 80% 2021-03-31 N/A - New indicator N/A - New indicator N/A

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for A Safe and Secure Transportation System

2020–21
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)

2020–21
planned spending

2021–22
planned spending

2022–23
planned spending

440,999,964

440,999,964

433,325,596

391,836,960

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for A Safe and Secure Transportation System

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents

2021–22
planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
planned full-time equivalents

3,603

3,587

3,428

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 2: Green and Innovative Transportation System

Description

Advances the Government of Canada's environmental agenda in the transportation sector by reducing harmful air emissions; protects Canada's ocean and marine environments by reducing the impact of marine shipping; and affirms a commitment to innovation in the transportation sector.

Planning highlights

  • Reduce greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions from transportation and embrace new clean technologies that improve Canadians’ lives. This includes:
  • Support domestic and international efforts to prevent and reduce the amount of marine plastic litter from ship based activities.
  • Develop new knowledge and tools to help the transportation sector adapt to climate change and build resiliency into its infrastructure and operations. This includes climate risk assessment processes, adaptive technologies and practices.
  • Build world-leading marine corridors that are competitive, safe and environmentally sustainable. We will also improve northern transportation infrastructure.
  • As part of the Oceans Protection Plan, focus on projects that will improve marine safety, responsible shipping, and strengthen the environmental stewardship of Canada’s coasts. This includes:
    • delivering 24/7 emergency response for incident management, to increase on-scene environmental response capacity;
    • preserving and restoring marine ecosystems by using new tools and research, and taking steps to deal with abandoned, hazardous and wrecked vessels. This includes implementing the Wrecked, Abandoned and Hazardous Vessels Act, creating an owner-financed program to remediate abandoned or hazardous vessels, improving the quality of vessel owner information and publishing enforcement actions taken;
    • funding organizations to train underrepresented groups, such as Indigenous people and women, for the marine industry;
    • advancing the development of partnerships with Indigenous peoples;
    • continuing to collaborate with Indigenous and coastal communities to pilot a new user-friendly system that provides a range of maritime information, including near real-time vessel traffic information;
    • continuing to update the national Proactive Vessel Management Framework (PVM) and identifying lessons learned through pilots to assess the possibility of a national roll-out of PVM;
    • monitoring the implementation of the amended Pilotage Act; and
    • continuing work to design and implement low-impact shipping corridors in the Arctic, including developing a governance model and working with the Canadian Coast Guard to determine priority areas for future federal action.
  • Continue the commitment to reconciliation by promoting collaboration and renewed relationships with Indigenous peoples by:
    • exploring new opportunities for co-management and partnership agreements;
    • establishing centralized relationships with the National Indigenous Organizations; and
    • identifying new opportunities to include Indigenous peoples in the transportation system in Canada.
  • Expand the capacity of the National Aerial Surveillance Program to help prevent and deter ship-source pollution and support the response during oil spills.
  • Work with Canadian industry and international partners to:
    • create fair, practical and environmentally protective ballast water regulations;
    • implement the Ballast Water Management Convention in Canada; and
    • update the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations to align Canada better with the Ballast Water Management Convention.
  • Reduce the economic and environmental risks from aquatic invasive species by:
    • Advancing new ballast water regulations; and
    • engaging with the domestic and international marine community on the need to control and manage ship biofouling.
  • Develop guidance to promote the safe testing and deployment of connected and automated vehicles, which have the potential to increase shared mobility services, and truck platooning which has the potential to reduce fuel consumption by up to 12%.
  • Commit, through Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada’s Innovative Solutions Canada Program, $1.3M to Small and Medium size Enterprises to develop early-stage and pre-commercial innovations related to solving transportation related issues.
  • Advance the modernization of TC’s Motor Vehicle Test Centre through targeted investments at the site, expanded partner engagement and in developing a multi-year implementation plan.

Gender-based analysis plus

Our programs within Core Responsibility 2, “Green and Innovative Transportation System”, have identified a number of GBA+ initiatives and issues they are either currently working on, have recently completed or plan to undertake within the coming fiscal year and beyond, most notably:

  • As part of the Oceans Protection Plan, we will continue to address the underrepresentation of women and Indigenous persons in the marine sector with new training and learning opportunities.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Through Transport Canada’s Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative, we will take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts to actively contribute to United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 13. This initiative aims to enhance Northerners’ capacity to adapt their transportation systems to climate change and supports a better understanding of risks to federal transportation assets.

To advance United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 14, Life Below Water, we will continue to advance research, analysis and implementation of operational and technical measures that will help reduce the impact of marine transportation on the marine environment, in particular endangered whale populations.

Planned results for Green and Innovative Transportation System

Result 4: Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
4a) Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced Percentage change in emissions of greenhouse gases from the transportation sector from 2005 levels Contribute to the achievement of Canada’s national target to reduce emissions by 30% by 2030 from 2005 levels 2030-12-31 7.5% above 2005 levels (2016) 7.5% above 2005 levels (2017) 2018 data not yet available
Result 5: Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
5a) Canada’s oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts Rate of spills, per hour, into Canada’s oceans and marine environments (per 1,000 active vessels)Footnote 15 5% reduction in spills from one year to the next 2021-03-31 N/A - New Indicator N/A - New Indicator 0.15/hr
Result 6: A transportation system that supports innovation
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
6a) A transportation system that supports innovation Number of new aeronautical products certified Variance remains +/- 10% year-over-year 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator 820
6b) A transportation system that supports innovation The number of innovative motor vehicle features introduced in Canada through the use of Transport Canada’s regulatory tools that facilitate innovative technologies Average annual increase of 10% in Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) technologies in the overall light duty fleet in Canada.Footnote 16 2023-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Green and Innovative Transportation System

2020–21
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)

2020–21
planned spending

2021–22
planned spending

2022–23
planned spending

321,204,902

321,204,902

231,208,287

174,738,499

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for A Safe and Secure Transportation System

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents

2021–22
planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
planned full-time equivalents

647

614

491

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Core Responsibility 3: Efficient Transportation System

Description

Supports efficient market access to products through investment in Canada’s trade corridors; adopts and implement rules and policies that promote sufficient choice and improved service to Canadian travellers and shippers; and manages transportation assets to ensure value for Canadians.

Planning highlights

  • Ensure Transport Canada’s airports and ports remain available for use through health and safety-related initiatives.
  • Promote trade and economic growth by reviewing the governance structures of marine assets managed by Transport Canada. This work is part of the Ports Modernization Review and the St. Lawrence Seaway Review.
  • Ensure that ferry services that are part of the Eastern Canada Ferries program are reliable and predictable. This includes moving forward with the procurement of two new vessels to be built at Chantier Davie to replace the MV Madeleine and MV Holiday Island.
  • Introduce a regulatory proposal for weekly public freight rail service and performance metrics to improve public information about the performance of Canada’s freight rail network.
  • Support the High Frequency Rail Joint Project Office, in collaboration with VIA Rail’s High Frequency Rail and the Canada Infrastructure Bank, to finalize the assessment of the proposal to create High Frequency Rail in the Toronto-Ottawa-Montréal-Québec City Corridor. This work includes research into:
    • route and alignment options;
    • choice of technology;
    • ensuring integration and interoperability with other rail systems in Montreal and Toronto;
    • revenue and ridership;
    • operating and capital costs; and
    • approaches for building and operating the services.
  • Setting the Transportation Modernization Act’s public reporting requirements by establishing and managing data governance and capacity.
  • Help to address labour shortages across modes by working with industry, stakeholders, and other government partners. We will support a fully capable and diverse transportation workforce in Canada, including engaging underrepresented groups (including women and Indigenous peoples). We will also collect data, conduct additional research, and seek opportunities to support training institutions and individuals.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

As part of the UN Sustainable Development Goal 5 on Gender Equality, we will work to advance gender equality in the transportation sector. We will work with international partners and at international forums such as the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation and International Transport Forum.

Projects delivered under the National Trade Corridors Fund will build stronger, more resilient, and more efficient transportation corridors for trade with global markets, and support jobs and growth. The initiative’s outcomes contribute to multiple United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, including Goals: 9, Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure and 11, Sustainable Cities and Communities.

Planned results for Efficient Transportation System

Result 7: Transportation corridors get products reliably to market
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
7a) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end, rail transit time of containers along the trade corridor from Canadian west coast ports to Chicago, including border crossing time Between 0 and 38.5 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
7b) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end, Canada-side, truck transit time of general freight along the Toronto to United States trade corridor, including border crossing time Between 0 and 25 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
7c) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end transit time of containerized freight arriving from ports in Asia At most 25 2021-03-31 23.8 Days (2016) Result Unavailable 27.4 days
7d) Transportation corridors get products reliably to market End-to-end transit time of a select grouping of commodities, such as grains, departing from Canada to Asia Average 38 days of end-to-end transit time 2021-03-31 38.4 Days (2016) Result Unavailable 39 days
Result 8: Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and improved service
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
8a) Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and improved service Percentage of designation requests from Canadian carriers for international scheduled services processed 100% 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
8b) Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and improved service Percentage of exemption requests from foreign carriers for domestic services processed 100% 2021-03-31 N/A 213 223 (Year over year – +4.7%)
8c) Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and improved service Ratio of federal government funding per passenger mile given for intercity rail passengers $0.40 per passenger mile 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
8d) Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and improved service Percentage of total communities over a certain size with scheduled intercity surface transportation services TBD TBD N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
8e) Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and improved service Percentage of Canadians living within 40km of a public transportation service point TBD TBD N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator
Result 9: Transport Canada manages its assets effectively
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 actual result 2017-18 actual result 2018-19 actual result
9a) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed airports 100% (certain types of events are excluded from the calculation) 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator 100%
9b) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ports 100% (certain types of events are excluded from the calculation) 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator 100%
9c) Transport Canada manages its assets effectively Availability of Transport Canada owned and managed ferries 100% (certain types of events are excluded from the calculation) 2021-03-31 N/A – New Indicator N/A – New Indicator 100%

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Green and Innovative Transportation System

2020–21
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)

2020–21
planned spending

2021–22
planned spending

2022–23
planned spending

927,054,699

927,054,699

774,071,457

669,313,626

Financial, human resources and performance information for Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for A Safe and Secure Transportation System

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents

2021–22
planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
planned full-time equivalents

518

514

490

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned results for Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning highlights

  • Modernize our fees by making changes to regulations and putting the Service Fees Act requirements in place. We will also plan for the long term digital implementation of new fees by making improvements in processes and using new digital tools.
  • Continue to work on the following audits:
    • TC’s Organizational Culture;
    • Oceans Protection Program; and
    • Transformation.
  • Conduct evaluations of the:
    • Trade and Transportation Corridor Initiative;
    • Safety and Security Standby Services;
    • TC’s Savings and Reallocations as a Result of the Comprehensive Review; and
    • Fee Modernization.
  • Use a digital first approach to serve our stakeholders and Canadian citizens and to inform and engage with audiences in a transparent way.
  • Increase the use of technology like robotics process automation and data analytics to improve our processes and services and to help us make effective decisions.
  • Address barriers to program and service delivery, innovation and data-sharing through regulatory and legislative modernization and policy design.
  • Revitalize our Human Resources Systems. This will streamline transactions and give our managers access to self-service reports and dashboards to support people management decisions that are driven by data.

Gender-based analysis plus

Transport Canada created a GBA-Plus function to oversee and promote GBA+. TC has also appointed a Champion to act as an advocate for GBA+, to raise its profile, encourage training, and monitor and facilitate its use.

In addition, the GBA+ online course, offered by the Department for Women and Gender Equality, is now a mandatory course for Transport Canada employees. This course is meant to help our workforce understand the needs of men, women and gender-diverse persons in all of their facets. This knowledge will also help employees better understand how to apply GBA+ when developing policies, legislation, regulations, programs and services for Canadians.

As required under the Government of Canada’s Policy on Communications and Federal Identity, the Communications Group will communicate information in multiple formats to accommodate the diverse needs of Canadians and ensure it is equally accessible to all audiences, including Indigenous, ethno-cultural and official-language minority communities. To ensure the information needs of all Canadians is met, we will:

  • apply the policies and regulations of the Official Languages Act and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms;
  • ensure that communications materials are neutral and depict the diverse nature of Canadians in a fair, representative and inclusive manner, including a balance of gender and ethnicity; and
  • adhere to the Standard on Web Accessibility and provide published information on request that is substantially equal for a diverse audience and those with disabilities.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Under Sustainable Development Goal 5 on Gender Equality, we will work towards advancing gender equality in the transportation sector in collaboration with international partners and through international fora (e.g. the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation and International Transport Forum).

Experimentation

Explore the use of technologies such as robotics, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality to transition to a more digital government and improve programs and services to Canadians.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

2020–21
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)

2020–21
planned spending

2021–22
planned spending

2022–23
planned spending

210,238,822

210,238,822

208,922,563

195,132,602

Planned human resources for Internal Services

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents

2021–22
planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
planned full-time equivalents

1,346

1,316

1,225

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years, and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years’ actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2017–18 to 2022–23

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

 

 
Departmental spending graph

Fiscal year

Total

Voted

Statutory

2017–18

1,205,720,765

987,036,619

218,684,146

2018–19

1,228,931,304

1,024,910,737

204,020,567

2019–20

1,793,513,950

1,580,028,260

213,485,690

2020–21

1,899,498,387

1,667,945,146

231,553,241

2021–22

1,647,527,903

1,427,725,361

219,802,542

2022–23

1,431,021,687

1,223,948,662

207,073,025

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of Transport Canada’s core responsibilities and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Core responsibilities and Internal Services

2017–18
expenditures

2018–19
expenditures

2019–20
expenditures

2020–21
budgetary spending
(as indicated in Main Estimates)

2020–21
planned spending

2021–22
planned spending

2022–23
planned spending

CR 1: Safe and Secure Transportation System

N/A

422,517,720

439,288,306

440,999,964

440,999,964

433,325,596

391,836,960

SO 3: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

444,241,305

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

CR 2: Green and Innovative Transportation System

N/A

165,832,698

388,467,436

321,204,902

321,204,902

231,208,287

174,738,499

SO 2: A Clean Transportation System

113,335,926

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

CR 3: Efficient Transportation System

N/A

443,958,944

750,364,580

927,054,699

927,054,699

774,071,457

669,313,626

SO 1: An Efficient Transportation System

455,318,523

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Subtotal

1,012,895,753

1,032,309,363

1,578,120,322

1,689,259,565

1,689,259,565

1,438,605,340

1,235,889,085

Internal Services

192,825,011

196,621,944

215,393,628

210,238,822

210,238,822

208,922,563

195,132,602

Total

1,205,720,765

1,228,931,304

1,793,513,950

1,899,498,387

1,899,498,387

1,647,527,903

1,431,021,687

Spending Analysis

As illustrated in the departmental spending trend graph, Transport Canada’s expenditures increased from fiscal year 2017-18 and 2018-19 levels to 2019-20. The is mainly due to incremental funding for such initiatives as the National Trade Corridor Fund, the Port Asset Transfer Program as well as the new Zero-emission vehicles initiative.

Expenditures continue to increase in 2020-21 mainly related to incremental funding under the National Trade Corridor Fund and the Oceans Protection Plan. Funding also increased for new initiatives such as the Trans Mountain Expansion Project and initiatives to protect marine life. These are partially offset by decreases in 2020-21 for initiatives such as the Zero-emission vehicles initiative and the Port Asset Transfer Program.

Spending Plans for 2021-22 and 2022-23

Spending plans decline after 2020-21 mostly due to sunsetting funding for initiatives such as the:

  • Zero-emission vehicles initiative;
  • Regional and Remote Passenger Rail Services Contribution Program;
  • Gateways and Border Crossings Fund;
  • Transformation;
  • Ferry Services Contribution Program; and,
  • Capital expenditures for infrastructure funding.

A decrease in funding is also expected for various initiatives such as the Oceans Protection Plan and National Trade Corridor Fund.

The planned spending does not include expected funding for items included in Budget 2020.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in Transport Canada’s departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services

Core responsibilities and Internal Services

2017–18
actual full-time equivalents

2018–19
actual full-time equivalents

2019–20
forecast full-time equivalents

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents

2021–22
planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
planned full-time equivalents

CR 1: Safe and Secure Transportation System

N/A

3,371

3,507

3,603

3,587

3,428

SO 3: A Safe and Secure Transportation System

3,242

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

CR 2: Green and Innovative Transportation System

N/A

571

647

647

614

491

SO 2: A Clean Transportation System

325

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

CR 3: Efficient Transportation System

N/A

471

492

518

514

490

SO 1: An Efficient Transportation System

426

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Subtotal

3,993

4,413

4,646

4,768

4,715

4,409

Internal Services

1,221

1,377

1,425

1,346

1,316

1,225

Total

5,214

5,790

6,071

6,114

6,031

5,634

As illustrated in the above table, FTEs increased from 2017-18 to 2020-21. This increase is mostly due to such initiatives as the Oceans Protection Plan, the Trade Transportation Corridor Initiative, the Trans Mountain Expansion project and initiatives for the protection of marine life.

Planned FTEs are expected to decline after 2020-21, primarily as a result of reduced and sunsetting funding for initiatives such as the Tanker Safety Inspection Program, the Oceans Protection Plan, Transformation, the Trans Mountain Expansion project and the Trade Transportation Corridor Initiative.

The planned FTEs do not include expected funding for items included in Budget 2020.

Estimates by vote

Information on the Transport Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2019 20 Main Estimates.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations

The condensed future oriented statement of operations provides an overview of Transport Canada’s operations for 2019–20 to 2020–21.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Transport Canada’s website.

Condensed future oriented statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)

Financial Information

2019–20
forecast Results

2020–21
planned Results

Difference
(2020–21 planned results minus
2019–20 forecast results)

Total expenses

1,981,733

2,021,679

39,946

Total revenues

76,864

72,796

-4,068

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

1,904,869

1,948,883

44,014

Note: Due to rounding, the figures may not agree with the totals or details provided elsewhere. These figures are prepared on an accrual basis and therefore differ from the planned spending in other sections of this Departmental Plan.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister(s): The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Institutional head: Michael Keenan

Ministerial portfolio: Transport Canada

The Transport Portfolio includes:

Grouping these organizations into one portfolio allows for integrated decision making on transportation issues.

Enabling instrument(s): Department of Transport Act (R.S., 1985, c. T-18)

Transport Canada administers over 50 laws related to transportation and shares the administration of many others. Justice Canada is the federal department responsible for maintaining the Consolidated Statutes of Canada and provides access to the full text of federal acts and regulations.

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1936

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Transport Canada’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the “Minister’s mandate letter”.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on the Transport Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

Transport Canada’s approved Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory for 2020–21 are as follows.

Core Responsibility 1: Safe and Secure Transportation System

Result 1: A safe transportation system

Result Indicators: (air, marine, rail) Accident rates over a 10-year period; fatality rates over a 10-year period.

Result Indicators: Rate of reportable road traffic collisions in Canada; rate of serious injuries in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada; rate of fatalities in reportable road traffic collisions in Canada.

Result Indicator: Number of reportable dangerous goods accidents per year.

Result 2: A secure transportation system

Result Indicators: Rate of refusals of new Transportation Security Clearances; rates of suspension/ cancellations of Transportation Security Clearances.

Result Indicator: (air, marine) Rate of compliance of sector operators with Transport Canada’s security regulations.

Result 3: A modern safety and security regime that supports economic growth

Result Indicator: Percentage of new Canadian Rail Safety operating and equipment safety rules aligned with the US Rail Safety operating and equipment rules.

Result Indicators: (air, marine) Percentage of Transport Canada's safety and security regulations aligned with international transportation standards.

Result Indicators: (air, marine, transportation of dangerous goods) Percentage of client requests for safety authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards.

Result Indicator: Percentage of Transport Canada aviation security regulations that align with international transportation standards.

Result Indicator: (air, marine) Percentage of client requests for security authorizations that meet Transport Canada's service standards.

Program Inventory under Core Responsibility 1:

  • Aviation Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Aviation Safety Oversight
  • Aviation Safety Certification
  • Aircraft Services
  • Marine Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Marine Safety Oversight
  • Marine Safety Certification
  • Navigation Protection Program
  • Rail Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Rail Safety Oversight
  • Rail Safety Improvement Program
  • Multimodal and Road Safety Regulatory Framework
  • Multimodal and Road Safety Oversight
  • TDG Regulatory Framework
  • TDG Oversight
  • TDG Technical Support
  • Aviation Security Regulatory Framework
  • Aviation Security Oversight
  • Marine Security Regulatory Framework
  • Marine Security Oversight
  • Intermodal Surface Security Regulatory Framework
  • Intermodal Surface Security Oversight
  • Multimodal Safety and Security Services
  • Security Screening Certification
  • Emergency Management

Core Responsibility 2: Green and Innovative Transportation System

Result 4: Harmful air emissions from transportation in Canada are reduced

Result Indicator: Percentage change in emissions of greenhouse gases from the transportation sector from 2005 levels.

Result 5: Canada's oceans and marine environments are protected from marine shipping impacts

Result Indicator: Rate of spills into Canada's ocean and marine environments per thousand active vessels.

Result 6: A transportation system that supports innovation

Result Indicator: Number of new aeronautical products certified.

Result Indicator: Number of innovative motor vehicle features introduced in Canada through the use of Transport Canada’s regulatory tools that facilitate innovative technologies.

Program Inventory under Core Responsibility 2

  • Climate Change and Clean Air
  • Protecting Oceans and Waterways
  • Environmental Stewardship of Transportation
  • Transportation Innovation
  • Indigenous Partnerships and Engagement

Core Responsibility 3: Efficient Transportation System

Result 7: Transportation corridors get products reliably to market

Result Indicator: End-to-end, transit time of containers along the trade corridor from Canadian west coast ports to Chicago, including border crossing time.

Result Indicator: End-to-end, Canada-side, truck transit time of general freight along the Toronto to United States trade corridor, including border crossing time.

Result Indicator: End-to-end transit time of containerized freight arriving from ports in Asia.

Result Indicator: End-to-end transit time of a select grouping of commodities, such as grains, departing from Canada to Asia.

Result 8: Canadian travellers and freight operators benefit from choice and increased service

Result Indicator: Percentage of designation requests from Canadian carriers for international scheduled services processed.

Result Indicator: Percentage of exemption requests from foreign carriers for domestic services processed.

Result Indicator: Ratio of federal government funding per passenger mile given for intercity rail passengers.

Result Indicator: Percentage of total communities over a certain size with scheduled intercity surface transportation services.

Result Indicator: Percentage of Canadians living within 40km of a public transportation service point.

Result 9: Transport Canada manages its assets effectively

Result Indicators: Percentage of Transport Canada owned and managed transportation assets that remain operational (airports, ports, ferries).

Program Inventory under Core Responsibility 3

  • Transportation Marketplace Frameworks
  • Transportation Analysis
  • National Trade Corridors
  • Transportation Infrastructure

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Transport Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Transport Canada’s website under Departmental Plans:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Details on transfer payment programs
  • Gender-based analysis plus
  • Horizontal initiatives

Federal tax expenditures

Transport Canada’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2020–21.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government-wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address
Transport Canada (ADI)
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0N5

Telephone: 613-990-2309

Fax: 613-954-4731

Email: Questions@tc.gc.ca

Website(s): Transport Canada website

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3 year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn’t. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.

full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales) For the purpose of the 2020–21 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.

result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.